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With this harvest dashboard, we aim to keep you informed about the status of the harvest in each of the seven origins where Caravela operates, providing you with valuable information that will help you stay up to date of what’s happening on-the-ground.

Please visit this page frequently as we will be updating it at least once a month. If you have any specific questions, do not hesitate to contact us directly!


Last Update July 01, 2022

 


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

In the month of May, the PECA team has been registering the development of the harvest and flowering in Oaxaca and Chiapas. The beans are in development stage with precipitation being normal currently. The arrival of the Agatha Hurricane caused severe damages on the South Sierra of Oaxaca in the regions of San Pedro Pochutla, Santa Maria Ozolotepec, San Pedro El Alto and San Antonio Ozolotepec. The strong winds caused damages on the farms, causing falling of the fruits which could affect the volumes of the next harvest.The flowering continues and we would expect a good volume, but if the rains continue due to Agatha Hurricane, we could see a spike in leaf rust which could affect the harvest of Oaxaca.We keep sending shipments to the different destinies, and we have programed 6 containers for June. The dry mill process is still going on with the support from Quality in the assurance of quality. In areas such as Puebla, Guerrero, and Veracruz we are exploring new zones to be able to expand brand and volumes that helps us in the growth of the operation and strengthen Caravela’s presence in Mexico as a commercial allied for high-quality coffee.

 

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The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

Cherry development has begun after abundant and uniform flowering events. The weather has been good, but the country is entering the rainy season. If the rains continue, the coffee plants could be affected. Heavy rains can cause cherry abortion/dropping to the ground, fungal growth due to increased humidity, e.g., optimal for the growth of Ojo de Gallo (Mycena Citricolor). The PECA team continues to monitor the weather, sending digital weather bulletins and updates to farmers in the regions where we work.The quality has been maintained throughout this harvest. Towards the end of the harvest, lots of exotic varieties such as Geisha, Pacamara, and Maragogype, among others, from Chimaltenango, Jalapa, Jutiapa, and other regions have been received and purchased. This is the result of new relationships and the innovative spirit of Guatemalan coffee farmers. Currently, the technical team's report reflects that the harvest is progressing at a good growth rate, and excellent quality and volumes are expected for 2023. The challenge remains as the price of fertilizers continue to increase, from 170% to 190%, with prices from $47 to $63 per 45 kg bag.

Forward and spot contracts have landed in the US, and we have more containers heading to Europe, Australia, and Asia. Organic coffee was available this year, and as we continue to strengthen relationships and the organic supply chain in Guatemala, we expect to increase the volume offered.

Additionally, we have invested in a completely new packing machine, and now green coffee buyers and roasters will be able to order delivery of vacuum-packed boxes from Guatemala. This year, some boxes are heading to Asia and Australia. To explore this packaging option for X-Grade, ML, and AAA coffees, please contact your sales representative.


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

In the Chalatenango area, the harvest has 8 weeks of development and progresses with good vegetative growth. Here, some farms had two to three flowering events that marked the development of the cherry and the future rate of maturation. This is the time to control coffee borer beetle (CBB) and coffee leaf rust (CLR) and work on fertilization plans. Additionally, farmers in Ahuachapan and Santa Ana have good expectations for the 2023 harvest, as there were two flowerings, and the fruit is developing at a good pace. Growers focus on replanting and first fertilization. Rains are forecast for the coming weeks, which could delay activities such as manual shade management or fertilization by soil leaching due to water seepage.This month, the PECA and Quality team are providing training and feedback on the lots delivered in 2022 since we finished our last parchment purchases in Chalantenango and Ahuachapán purchasing stations. There is 80% progress in the fertilizer’s application corresponding to the first round, despite the delays experienced due to the availability of inputs in the country and the increased costs. For example, a 45kg bag of fertilizers rose from $31 to $59, directly impacting the producer's purchasing power, doing less with the available resources.Coffee purchases have ended, and the team is working diligently on shipments scheduled for this month to Oakland, Houston, Melbourne, Sydney, New York, and Keelung. We recommend contacting your customer sales representative to keep track of arrivals and spot samples. The PECA team continues to focus on activities and initiatives related to the carbon footprint, farm management, and feedback with coffee farmers at this time, which is crucial for the next harvest.


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

Currently, coffee growers are preparing for farm agronomic management activities for the next 2022-2023 harvest cycle. For the next harvest, everything points to a good production at the national level, since the blooms this year have been very good, so large volumes are expected, higher than those of the 2021-2022 cycle.The country's total harvest for this current cycle was low because plantations on farms suffered the impact of hurricanes ETA and IOTA in 2020, which directly affected floral differentiation, causing change in the coffee cycle. This led to total production output being reduced by 50% in some cases. Additionally, there is a labor shortage, which is the product of emigration in search of new life opportunities.

On the positive side, purchases this year have increased due to requests from our roaster partners. With requests from long-time customers who have not only worked with Caravela for several years but also new clients who are interested in learning about Nicaraguan culture and coffee profiles.
PECA is focusing on data consolidation of the carbon footprint. Likewise, the technical monitoring of the farms after harvest, monitoring of pests and diseases, diagnosis of flowering, and provision of meteorological information through weather alert bulletins.

The quality department is securing the shipments scheduled for June, and the closing and consolidation of the productions in our patented cloud-based purchasing system, Atlas.


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

Currently in Colombia, we are advancing with the harvest at a 55% in Tolima, 38% in Cauca, 37% in center west of Huila and 35% in south of Huila. We are still experiencing rains, although mostly in high altitude farms. Regarding cherry picking, we have started to see greater volumes in the second half of the month. Coffee growers have been focusing on weed control, fertilization, cherry picking and processing the first passes.Quality wise, the coffee purchased in May is mostly RTB, and some A’s and AA’s. The quality is expected to improve during June and July. During May, we have seen producers still commercializing wet coffee, taking advantage of the market price for conventional coffee. We have also noticed that coffee growers have been able to find cherry pickers either from the same region or friends, and not experiencing shortage of labor.PECA has been working during May in measuring the carbon footprint at the farms as well as identifying the plant species. They have been also accompanying the producers in best practices for processing coffee and the motivation of doing a good drying. Our Quality team has been busy purchasing coffee at the warehouses and doing the sensory and physical analysis to give timely feedback to the coffee producers.


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

The harvest in the southern part of Ecuador is advancing at a good pace. In Loja we are reaching the middle of the harvest, as we are currently at 41% and expecting the peak of the harvest for July and going until August. The coffee producers have been focused on cherry picking. At Zamora, also in the south, we are at a 28% of the harvest but also expecting the pick to start in July and go until August, with the whole of the harvest ending in October.

In the North of the country, the harvest is advancing at a 40% with the climate getting better as the precipitations are dropping. We’re expecting the pick of the harvest to be between June and July and ending in August.
The harvest in the South of Ecuador had a promising flowering, and in harvest estimations showing a promise of having greater volumes than last year. The issue we have been seeing, are coffee producers deciding not to pulp the coffee so they can sell it as “café bolo” which currently has been seeing prices like pulped coffees.

On the North of Ecuador, the issues of climate during the development of the fruit caused the loss of coffee and the harvest estimations were low. On the other hand, the talk about the high prices of the market have complicated the purchase of coffee in the North.
PECA has been focusing on visiting the coffee producers doing personalized visits to advise on harvest and post-harvest management, plus also dispersing doubts about the price. The PECA technicians have also talked about the security of the company in the purchase of washed coffee and the importance of fulfilling the volumes agreed upon, making emphasis on long term relationships. We have been coordinating meetings in different areas to have these talks with the coffee producers along with our PECA and Quality Coordinator of Ecuador, to give assurance to the producers.


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

The harvest in the north, Cajamarca, is still on the beginning advancing at 22%. We have seen precipitations above normal, creating negative conditions for the crop. The levels of coffee borer beetle are at a medium level currently. In some areas of Cajamarca, we’ve registered droppage of fruit due to the excess rain and an increase in coffee leaf rust. The enduring sentiment in the coffee producers has been negative due to the constant rains at this time of year which hasn’t allowed to carry on the necessary works at the farm. Likewise, many of the producers have reported a diminishment of productivity in most of these areas.

In the South, in Cusco, the harvest is at an 8%, with the coffee borer beetle at a medium level. In some areas of Cusco, we have registered droppage of fruit due to the heavy rains and because of the humidity, an increase in coffee leaf rust. The coffee producers are currently carrying on the first pickings.
We have seen the commitment of the new coffee producers of working with us during the present year and carrying on different workshops that will allow producers to improve their coffee quality, contributing to their family development. On the quality side, we have seen coffees with good overall quality with a lower index of defects in the lots and samples compared to last year. In Cajamarca the harvest will be lower than last year in about 30% due to the negative climate conditions which affected the fruit development. Another factor affecting the harvest volumes has been the increase on the price of fertilizers.

In Cusco, the harvest will also experience a decrease compared to last years, we’re expecting a 25% decrease in volume because of the same factors than in the North: the abrupt increase on fertilizers prices. A main effect in the farms of this factor, has been, that given the lack of fertilization the conditions for the incidence of coffee leaf rust are optimal. On the positive side, we have seen an increase in quality on the samples being received.
Our shipments are Schedule to begin in August onwards, so as of right now we have been organizing ourselves with time with the offers to the CRO’s offices. PECA and Quality have been carrying on ECAS and workshops with the producers where we touch upon topics such as fertilizations plans, harvest and post-harvest management, filling the activity notebook and registry of production costs.

We have been also visiting new areas to secure the purchasing of coffee and fulfill the contracts. In these new areas we have been also promoting the work of Caravela and ECAS. The PECA technicians have also been carrying on individual visits to the producers who are in the process of the organic certification and RFA, preparing them for the external audit for both certifications. There have also been individual visits focused on fertilization, harvest and post-harvest management as they’re right now on these activities at their farms.

With this harvest dashboard, we aim to keep you informed about the status of the harvest in each of the seven origins where Caravela operates, providing you with valuable information that will help you stay up to date of what’s happening on-the-ground.

Please visit this page frequently as we will be updating it at least once a month. If you have any specific questions, do not hesitate to contact us directly!


Last Update July 01, 2022

 

The Facts

In the month of May, the PECA team has been registering the development of the harvest and flowering in Oaxaca and Chiapas. The beans are in development stage with precipitation being normal currently. The arrival of the Agatha Hurricane caused severe damages on the South Sierra of Oaxaca in the regions of San Pedro Pochutla, Santa Maria Ozolotepec, San Pedro El Alto and San Antonio Ozolotepec. The strong winds caused damages on the farms, causing falling of the fruits which could affect the volumes of the next harvest.

Our Take

The flowering continues and we would expect a good volume, but if the rains continue due to Agatha Hurricane, we could see a spike in leaf rust which could affect the harvest of Oaxaca.

Next Steps

We keep sending shipments to the different destinies, and we have programed 6 containers for June. The dry mill process is still going on with the support from Quality in the assurance of quality. In areas such as Puebla, Guerrero, and Veracruz we are exploring new zones to be able to expand brand and volumes that helps us in the growth of the operation and strengthen Caravela’s presence in Mexico as a commercial allied for high-quality coffee.

 

The Facts

Cherry development has begun after abundant and uniform flowering events. The weather has been good, but the country is entering the rainy season. If the rains continue, the coffee plants could be affected. Heavy rains can cause cherry abortion/dropping to the ground, fungal growth due to increased humidity, e.g., optimal for the growth of Ojo de Gallo (Mycena Citricolor). The PECA team continues to monitor the weather, sending digital weather bulletins and updates to farmers in the regions where we work.

Our Take

Based on the latest farm visits and PECA field reports, next year’s total production looks promising. One of the main challenges that farmers are now facing is the increase in input prices and labor costs, affecting the Central American region in general.

There has been an increase in AAA and ML available, with most of it being exotic varieties and or natural coffee, yet quantities are limited. As more farmers join our supply chain, across the country, there has been an increase in volume. Currently, our quality control team reports quality has been maintained for all PECA growers. The Quality Assurance team continues to perform quality control for all shipments and sending PSS to our Customer Relations Offices (CRO).

 

Next Steps

Forward and spot contracts have landed in the US, and we have more containers heading to Europe, Australia, and Asia. Organic coffee was available this year, and as we continue to strengthen relationships and the organic supply chain in Guatemala, we expect to increase the volume offered.

Additionally, we have invested in a completely new packing machine, and now green coffee buyers and roasters will be able to order delivery of vacuum-packed boxes from Guatemala. This year, some boxes are heading to Asia and Australia. To explore this packaging option for X-Grade, ML, and AAA coffees, please contact your sales representative.

The Facts

In the Chalatenango area, the harvest has 8 weeks of development and progresses with good vegetative growth. Here, some farms had two to three flowering events that marked the development of the cherry and the future rate of maturation. This is the time to control coffee borer beetle (CBB) and coffee leaf rust (CLR) and work on fertilization plans. Additionally, farmers in Ahuachapan and Santa Ana have good expectations for the 2023 harvest, as there were two flowerings, and the fruit is developing at a good pace. Growers focus on replanting and first fertilization. Rains are forecast for the coming weeks, which could delay activities such as manual shade management or fertilization by soil leaching due to water seepage.

Our Take

This month, the PECA and Quality team are providing training and feedback on the lots delivered in 2022 since we finished our last parchment purchases in Chalantenango and Ahuachapán purchasing stations. There is 80% progress in the fertilizer’s application corresponding to the first round, despite the delays experienced due to the availability of inputs in the country and the increased costs. For example, a 45kg bag of fertilizers rose from $31 to $59, directly impacting the producer’s purchasing power, doing less with the available resources.

Next Steps

Coffee purchases have ended, and the team is working diligently on shipments scheduled for this month to Oakland, Houston, Melbourne, Sydney, New York, and Keelung. We recommend contacting your customer sales representative to keep track of arrivals and spot samples. The PECA team continues to focus on activities and initiatives related to the carbon footprint, farm management, and feedback with coffee farmers at this time, which is crucial for the next harvest.

The Facts

Currently, coffee growers are preparing for farm agronomic management activities for the next 2022-2023 harvest cycle. For the next harvest, everything points to a good production at the national level, since the blooms this year have been very good, so large volumes are expected, higher than those of the 2021-2022 cycle.

Our Take

The country’s total harvest for this current cycle was low because plantations on farms suffered the impact of hurricanes ETA and IOTA in 2020, which directly affected floral differentiation, causing change in the coffee cycle. This led to total production output being reduced by 50% in some cases. Additionally, there is a labor shortage, which is the product of emigration in search of new life opportunities.

On the positive side, purchases this year have increased due to requests from our roaster partners. With requests from long-time customers who have not only worked with Caravela for several years but also new clients who are interested in learning about Nicaraguan culture and coffee profiles.

Next Steps

PECA is focusing on data consolidation of the carbon footprint. Likewise, the technical monitoring of the farms after harvest, monitoring of pests and diseases, diagnosis of flowering, and provision of meteorological information through weather alert bulletins.

The quality department is securing the shipments scheduled for June, and the closing and consolidation of the productions in our patented cloud-based purchasing system, Atlas.

The Facts

Currently in Colombia, we are advancing with the harvest at a 55% in Tolima, 38% in Cauca, 37% in center west of Huila and 35% in south of Huila. We are still experiencing rains, although mostly in high altitude farms. Regarding cherry picking, we have started to see greater volumes in the second half of the month. Coffee growers have been focusing on weed control, fertilization, cherry picking and processing the first passes.

Our Take

Quality wise, the coffee purchased in May is mostly RTB, and some A’s and AA’s. The quality is expected to improve during June and July. During May, we have seen producers still commercializing wet coffee, taking advantage of the market price for conventional coffee. We have also noticed that coffee growers have been able to find cherry pickers either from the same region or friends, and not experiencing shortage of labor.

 

Next Steps

PECA has been working during May in measuring the carbon footprint at the farms as well as identifying the plant species. They have been also accompanying the producers in best practices for processing coffee and the motivation of doing a good drying. Our Quality team has been busy purchasing coffee at the warehouses and doing the sensory and physical analysis to give timely feedback to the coffee producers.

The Facts

The harvest in the southern part of Ecuador is advancing at a good pace. In Loja we are reaching the middle of the harvest, as we are currently at 41% and expecting the peak of the harvest for July and going until August. The coffee producers have been focused on cherry picking. At Zamora, also in the south, we are at a 28% of the harvest but also expecting the pick to start in July and go until August, with the whole of the harvest ending in October.

In the North of the country, the harvest is advancing at a 40% with the climate getting better as the precipitations are dropping. We’re expecting the pick of the harvest to be between June and July and ending in August.

Our Take

The harvest in the South of Ecuador had a promising flowering, and in harvest estimations showing a promise of having greater volumes than last year. The issue we have been seeing, are coffee producers deciding not to pulp the coffee so they can sell it as “café bolo” which currently has been seeing prices like pulped coffees.

On the North of Ecuador, the issues of climate during the development of the fruit caused the loss of coffee and the harvest estimations were low. On the other hand, the talk about the high prices of the market have complicated the purchase of coffee in the North.

Next Steps

PECA has been focusing on visiting the coffee producers doing personalized visits to advise on harvest and post-harvest management, plus also dispersing doubts about the price. The PECA technicians have also talked about the security of the company in the purchase of washed coffee and the importance of fulfilling the volumes agreed upon, making emphasis on long term relationships. We have been coordinating meetings in different areas to have these talks with the coffee producers along with our PECA and Quality Coordinator of Ecuador, to give assurance to the producers.

The Facts

The harvest in the north, Cajamarca, is still on the beginning advancing at 22%. We have seen precipitations above normal, creating negative conditions for the crop. The levels of coffee borer beetle are at a medium level currently. In some areas of Cajamarca, we’ve registered droppage of fruit due to the excess rain and an increase in coffee leaf rust. The enduring sentiment in the coffee producers has been negative due to the constant rains at this time of year which hasn’t allowed to carry on the necessary works at the farm. Likewise, many of the producers have reported a diminishment of productivity in most of these areas.

In the South, in Cusco, the harvest is at an 8%, with the coffee borer beetle at a medium level. In some areas of Cusco, we have registered droppage of fruit due to the heavy rains and because of the humidity, an increase in coffee leaf rust. The coffee producers are currently carrying on the first pickings.

Our Take

We have seen the commitment of the new coffee producers of working with us during the present year and carrying on different workshops that will allow producers to improve their coffee quality, contributing to their family development. On the quality side, we have seen coffees with good overall quality with a lower index of defects in the lots and samples compared to last year. In Cajamarca the harvest will be lower than last year in about 30% due to the negative climate conditions which affected the fruit development. Another factor affecting the harvest volumes has been the increase on the price of fertilizers.

In Cusco, the harvest will also experience a decrease compared to last years, we’re expecting a 25% decrease in volume because of the same factors than in the North: the abrupt increase on fertilizers prices. A main effect in the farms of this factor, has been, that given the lack of fertilization the conditions for the incidence of coffee leaf rust are optimal. On the positive side, we have seen an increase in quality on the samples being received.

Next Steps

Our shipments are Schedule to begin in August onwards, so as of right now we have been organizing ourselves with time with the offers to the CRO’s offices. PECA and Quality have been carrying on ECAS and workshops with the producers where we touch upon topics such as fertilizations plans, harvest and post-harvest management, filling the activity notebook and registry of production costs.

We have been also visiting new areas to secure the purchasing of coffee and fulfill the contracts. In these new areas we have been also promoting the work of Caravela and ECAS. The PECA technicians have also been carrying on individual visits to the producers who are in the process of the organic certification and RFA, preparing them for the external audit for both certifications. There have also been individual visits focused on fertilization, harvest and post-harvest management as they’re right now on these activities at their farms.

Calendar

Mexico

El Salvador
Colombia

Galapagos

Guatemala

Nicaragua

Ecuador

Peru

Mexico

El Salvador
Colombia

Galapagos

Guatemala

Nicaragua

Ecuador

Peru

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