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With this harvest dashboard, we aim to keep you informed about the status of the harvest in each of the seven origins where Caravela operates, providing you with valuable information that will help you stay up to date of what’s happening on-the-ground.

Please visit this page frequently as we will be updating it at least once a month. If you have any specific questions, do not hesitate to contact us directly!


Last Update February 13, 2024

 

 

Field Notes

Next Steps

Continuing our efforts, the PECA team persistently engages with producers, providing recommendations and feedback to optimize the ongoing harvest.

Simultaneously, the Quality Team is actively involved in purchasing lots, ensuring the expected quality standards. Furthermore, the Quality team shares valuable feedback with producers based on the results obtained from the labs.

Collaborating with the PECA team, our focus extends to gathering all necessary data to align with the new regulations of the European Union. This includes the collection of polygons and GPS points from farms exceeding four hectares.
Our current emphasis lies on the procurement of lots and the receipt of samples from the Chaltenango and Ahuachapan warehouses. Samples from low-altitude farms (1000 - 1250 MASL), predominantly exhibiting RTB and A qualities, are being received.

As February unfolds, the harvest is underway in Ahuachapan and Chaltenango, with many producers involved in harvesting or processing coffees. Anticipating an improvement in quality, particularly as high-altitude farms continue their coffee processing.

Our next step involves sending new samples to all sales offices, aligning teams with the qualities and profiles observed in our warehouses. This collaborative approach ensures a cohesive understanding and alignment across our various teams.

 

 

Field Notes

Next Steps

In Guatemala, the ongoing harvest in San Marcos reveals that the central and eastern parts of the department are currently experiencing an average yield of 25% (1100-1400 MASL). However, in contrast, the Huehuetenango department is facing challenges with only a 15% average harvest due to unexpected temperature fluctuations over the past couple of weeks.

Across both San Marcos and Huehuetenango, there is a noticeable decline in the harvest, attributed to a surge in cases of coffee rust affecting the crops.

The PECA team is actively engaged in supporting producers, primarily focusing on harvesting and processing protocols to enhance overall quality. Simultaneously, efforts are underway to gather essential data aligning with the new regulations of the European Union. This involves the collection of polygons and GPS points from farms exceeding four hectares.
Our next steps involve obtaining more samples from current harvests and acquiring lots arriving at the warehouses. The aim is to provide feedback to producers, emphasizing quality improvement for enhanced income opportunities.

Currently, in Santa Rosa, we are receiving offers for exotic coffees like Gesha, Pacamara, and Maragogipe, featuring honey and natural processes.

Additionally, we await the approval of the Organic certificate for our internal supply of producers in San Marcos and Huehuetenango.
So far, the quality acquired in January is rated as RTB to A quality. Nevertheless, we anticipate a quality enhancement by the conclusion of February. On the other hand, we project the inaugural export to the USA either by the end of February or the beginning of March.

 

 

Field Notes

Next Steps

January marks a huge phase in our operations within Mexico as we successfully launched three purchasing points in Chiapas and Puebla. Concurrently, sample offers started to arrive, providing us with the means to assess quality across the various regions where our presence is. 

The PECA team is actively preparing to implement processing protocols geared towards enhancing quality, and as a result  improved income for the producers.

An external audit for organic certification, conducted by Mayacert, meticulously review the entire supply chain from farms to exports, ensuring compliance with organic standards.

The ongoing harvest has been very positive, progressing by 10% by the end of January, thanks to favorable weather conditions
Our focus remains on sample reception and lot procurement in diverse warehouses. Simultaneously, the PECA team continues to offer constructive feedback to producers, not only to enhance quality and income but also to guide them in understanding their harvest flow.

Our headquarters and milling team are gearing up for the processing of dry parchment, with the first export scheduled for the conclusion of February.

Additionally, exploratory visits have started in areas earmarked for new projects in Regenerative Agriculture.

 

 

Field Notes

Next Steps

Nicaragua is currently at the peak of its harvest season, with approximately 48% of PECA farms actively engaged in harvesting. Our projection indicates that by the end of February, nearly all farms will reach their peak harvest activity.

Weather conditions pose an unexpected challenge, with sporadic rains complicating the processing of honey and natural coffees due to heightened humidity levels.

Undeterred by these challenges, the PECA team remains dedicated to on-site visits, extending assistance and technical support to farmers. This hands-on approach aims to enhance agricultural practices, ultimately contributing to improved coffee quality.

A significant limitation in Nicaragua rotates around workforce issues stemming from migration trends. This has led to a slower pace in coffee harvesting compared to previous years. We anticipate overcoming this challenge and wrapping up the harvest by the close of March. 
In Nicaragua, the imminent export of our first container is on the horizon, featuring RTB and A qualities.

As we find ourselves in the peak of the harvest, the majority of producers are delivering their coffees to our facilities. This allows us to provide constructive feedback, working collaboratively with PECA to enhance both quality and, consequently, income for the producers.

In preparation for the upcoming exports scheduled for March, we have already shared pre-shipment samples with our customers, ensuring readiness and alignment with their expectations.

Concurrently, the PECA team, with insights from the quality team, is actively visiting farmers. This effort mainly focuses on aiming to refine processes at the farm level, contributing to an overall improvement in coffee quality. 

 

 

Field Notes

Next Steps

In Colombia, January marks the final stages of processing the 2023 coffee harvest, while the commencement of harvesting for the 2024 cycles is underway. The month concludes with a notable trend towards a dry season, recording the lowest rainfall in the past 6 years, as reported by the PECA team.
Throughout January, the coffee quality at purchasing points is categorized as follows: RTB 67%, A 16%, AA 16%, and AAA 1%. The prevailing summer conditions contribute to challenges such as an increase in coffee berry borer instances and alterations in bean size, impacting the overall physical quality of the coffees.
The PECA team is actively collecting crucial data in accordance with new European Union regulations. This includes acquiring polygons and GPS points from farms exceeding four hectares. Concurrently, the team is distributing trees to producers as a proactive measure to alleviate the effects of the dry season.
Additionally, the PECA team is engaged in providing constructive feedback to producers for farm infrastructure maintenance. Despite observing a substantial amount of coffee on the trees during farm visits, the dry season poses a risk of potential coffee losses due to insufficient water availability for the trees.
The next month will involve ongoing harvest estimates for all producers. The team is also working on estimating the production costs of the 2023 harvest, aiding in the traceability of farmers' carbon footprint on their farms.

In the western part of Huila, an internal audit of RFA-certified farmers is in progress, slated for completion by the end of March. Subsequent activities include providing feedback to new producers striving to attain certification.

 

 

Field Notes

Next Steps

There have been rains in recent weeks due to the El Niño phenomenon. Zamora has started its harvests; this province experiences rainfall and irregular sunshine throughout the year, causing plants to bloom and harvests to occur almost year-round, with peak harvests in July and August. Loja, on the other hand, has well-defined seasons with maximum flowerings twice a year in October and November, leading to peak harvests in June-July. On the contrary, in the northern part of the country, harvests begin in March.

The PECA team is progressing with the implementation of the surveys for the compass of prosperity and completing the polygons for the European Union policy process. Likewise, there is constant on-field technical assistance, including pest and disease control, maintenance of processing and drying infrastructure, as well as harvesting and drying in accordance with the crop stage in different areas.

We are advancing in the project of residual water treatments donated by STARBUCKS. We are working with producers in the field, preparing the area where the system will be installed, and also obtaining quotations for the materials for their respective purchases.
We are progressing with the honey water treatment project donated by STARBUCKS. We are working with the producer in the field, preparing the area where the system will be installed, and also obtaining quotations for the materials for their respective purchases.
Some harvest estimates have been made, focusing on producers with contracts or those seeking advances for their harvests, and we will continue this effort. We will initiate the monitoring of harvest flows in the southern part of Ecuador, specifically in Zamora-Chinchipe, as this region is currently in the harvesting phase.
For the materials purchase of the honey water treatment project, we are already requesting the necessary documents for proper registration with our suppliers. We plan to proceed with the purchases this week, and the on-field installation is scheduled for the week of February 12th.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Field Notes

Next Steps

In Peru, we are currently in the fruit development season. In the areas at 1350-1450 meters above sea level (msnm), we are entering the grain ripening stage. In the middle zone at 1500-1600 msnm, the fruit is in the setting stage, while in the high zone at 1600-1900 msnm, the plots are starting the first phase of fruit development. In January, we took the opportunity to provide fertilization and fertilizing recommendations to producers for grain filling.

In Cajamarca, the climate is favorable for the development stage, with both rainy and warm days. So far, the weather impact has been positive, promising conditions for a good production this year. In Quillabamba, Cuzco, sunny days are prevailing this month, creating suitable conditions for crops.

Coffee farmers in both the North and the South are engaged in pruning and fertilization activities on their farms to ensure good setting, increased production, and quality preservation.

As PECA, we are executing our Work Plan, schedule, and programming for activities in February. We are addressing topics such as registrations for the Compass of Sustainability and Fertilization, along with internal inspections for the renewal of Organic and Rainforest Alliance certificates. In terms of quality, we are finishing the validation of information for the last shipments

The primary challenge in both regions is to increase the number of organic producers to meet the commitments for organic coffee. In the South, a significant challenge is to strengthen our presence in the Yantile area. 

Production is projected to increase by 5% for this year, and the quality is expected to improve due to favorable weather. However, we must wait and see how the following months unfold. The climate in Peru is currently suitable for coffee-growing areas, with temperatures rising on the coast and experiencing intense heat days
In the month of February, PECA will be making registrations for the Sustainability Compass (Production Costs, Living Income, Scorecard, and Carbon Footprint). Additionally, we will be delivering the results of soil analyses and fertilization plans to the group of producers visited for sample collection in December. The Quality department is entering the preparation phase to receive the 2024 Campaign through training sessions. Collaborating with PECA, we will formulate purchasing projections and strategies to address the challenges of this harvest and meet our purchasing commitments.

With this harvest dashboard, we aim to keep you informed about the status of the harvest in each of the seven origins where Caravela operates, providing you with valuable information that will help you stay up to date of what’s happening on-the-ground.

Please visit this page frequently as we will be updating it at least once a month. If you have any specific questions, do not hesitate to contact us directly!


Last Update February 13, 2024

 

Field Notes

Continuing our efforts, the PECA team persistently engages with producers, providing recommendations and feedback to optimize the ongoing harvest.

Simultaneously, the Quality Team is actively involved in purchasing lots, ensuring the expected quality standards. Furthermore, the Quality team shares valuable feedback with producers based on the results obtained from the labs.

Collaborating with the PECA team, our focus extends to gathering all necessary data to align with the new regulations of the European Union. This includes the collection of polygons and GPS points from farms exceeding four hectares.

Next Steps

Our current emphasis lies on the procurement of lots and the receipt of samples from the Chaltenango and Ahuachapan warehouses. Samples from low-altitude farms (1000 – 1250 MASL), predominantly exhibiting RTB and A qualities, are being received.

As February unfolds, the harvest is underway in Ahuachapan and Chaltenango, with many producers involved in harvesting or processing coffees. Anticipating an improvement in quality, particularly as high-altitude farms continue their coffee processing.

Our next step involves sending new samples to all sales offices, aligning teams with the qualities and profiles observed in our warehouses. This collaborative approach ensures a cohesive understanding and alignment across our various teams.

 

Field Notes

In Guatemala, the ongoing harvest in San Marcos reveals that the central and eastern parts of the department are currently experiencing an average yield of 25% (1100-1400 MASL). However, in contrast, the Huehuetenango department is facing challenges with only a 15% average harvest due to unexpected temperature fluctuations over the past couple of weeks.

Across both San Marcos and Huehuetenango, there is a noticeable decline in the harvest, attributed to a surge in cases of coffee rust affecting the crops.

The PECA team is actively engaged in supporting producers, primarily focusing on harvesting and processing protocols to enhance overall quality. Simultaneously, efforts are underway to gather essential data aligning with the new regulations of the European Union. This involves the collection of polygons and GPS points from farms exceeding four hectares.

Next Steps

Our next steps involve obtaining more samples from current harvests and acquiring lots arriving at the warehouses. The aim is to provide feedback to producers, emphasizing quality improvement for enhanced income opportunities.

Currently, in Santa Rosa, we are receiving offers for exotic coffees like Gesha, Pacamara, and Maragogipe, featuring honey and natural processes.

Additionally, we await the approval of the Organic certificate for our internal supply of producers in San Marcos and Huehuetenango.

So far, the quality acquired in January is rated as RTB to A quality. Nevertheless, we anticipate a quality enhancement by the conclusion of February. On the other hand, we project the inaugural export to the USA either by the end of February or the beginning of March.

 

 

Field Notes

Our focus remains on sample reception and lot procurement in diverse warehouses. Simultaneously, the PECA team continues to offer constructive feedback to producers, not only to enhance quality and income but also to guide them in understanding their harvest flow.

Our headquarters and milling team are gearing up for the processing of dry parchment, with the first export scheduled for the conclusion of February.

Additionally, exploratory visits have started in areas earmarked for new projects in Regenerative Agriculture.

Field Notes

Nicaragua is currently at the peak of its harvest season, with approximately 48% of PECA farms actively engaged in harvesting. Our projection indicates that by the end of February, nearly all farms will reach their peak harvest activity.

Weather conditions pose an unexpected challenge, with sporadic rains complicating the processing of honey and natural coffees due to heightened humidity levels.

Undeterred by these challenges, the PECA team remains dedicated to on-site visits, extending assistance and technical support to farmers. This hands-on approach aims to enhance agricultural practices, ultimately contributing to improved coffee quality.

A significant limitation in Nicaragua rotates around workforce issues stemming from migration trends. This has led to a slower pace in coffee harvesting compared to previous years. We anticipate overcoming this challenge and wrapping up the harvest by the close of March.

Next Steps

In Nicaragua, the imminent export of our first container is on the horizon, featuring RTB and A qualities.

As we find ourselves in the peak of the harvest, the majority of producers are delivering their coffees to our facilities. This allows us to provide constructive feedback, working collaboratively with PECA to enhance both quality and, consequently, income for the producers.

In preparation for the upcoming exports scheduled for March, we have already shared pre-shipment samples with our customers, ensuring readiness and alignment with their expectations.

Concurrently, the PECA team, with insights from the quality team, is actively visiting farmers. This effort mainly focuses on aiming to refine processes at the farm level, contributing to an overall improvement in coffee quality.

Field Notes

In Colombia, during the month of December, the final coffee harvesting rounds of the production cycle took place, and in a good part of the region, some minimal collections are expected to happen. The average harvesting progress stood at around 90%, almost across the board, with some areas like Risaralda and Tolima exceeding this percentage of progress. December concluded with rains in most areas, along with cloudy and cold days. During the month of December, of the coffee that arrived at the purchasing stations, 61% was RTB quality, and 25% was AA, in line with contract requirements.

As for PECA’s work, the Tolima team successfully handled the external audit for Caravela’s Organic certification. The team in the southern part of Huila carried out the delivery of trees to producers as an environmental contribution, while the team in the western part of Huila initiated the delivery of the results of soil physicochemical analysis for the productivity project component. Additionally, overall, the team concluded the year’s activities by reviewing their producers to align with the new regulations of the European Union and collecting polygons and GPS points according to the farm.

Next Steps

In progress and upcoming tasks; we continue with the establishment of polygons for farms larger than 4 hectares, following the established schedule for the due diligence process set by the European Union.

The PECA team in Tolima will work on conducting the NC (Non-Conformities) survey for the organic audit. In the Central West area of Huila and Pedregal (Cauca), the delivery of 690 trees, 50% forestry, and 50% fruit trees to 22 producers will take place, impacting a little over 130 hectares of coffee cultivation. In general, we expect to continue visiting producers to strengthen the loyalty process, as well as initiating coffee collections to meet the scheduled shipments for the first half of 2024.

Field Notes

During the month of December in Ecuador, the final harvesting rounds occurred in the Galápagos Islands, concluding their pickings. Meanwhile, on mainland Ecuador, the harvests have already concluded. In Zamora Chinchipe, the first harvesting rounds are expected in March, while in Loja, they are expected to begin in June. Reviewing the 2023 campaign, the quality distribution of purchases was as follows: A 63.98%, AA 35.31%, and AAA 0.71%.

All contracts were fulfilled in 2023, marking a year of increased productivity in the Zamora Chinchipe region due to favorable climatic conditions. Zamora Chinchipe represented 49% of the total purchased in the 2023 campaign.

Additionally, the organic certification of Caravela’s own group was achieved, consisting of 11 coffee producers from Loja and Zamora Chinchipe.

Next Steps

Within our work plan, we continue with tasks to comply with the new European Union regulations mapping farms larger than 4 hectares with a polygon, addressing non-conformities in the organic group, and delivering trees from the project (fruit and forestry), aiming to achieve 100% completion by the end of January. Currently, we have made progress of 50% concerning the trees which have already been delivered to 7 producers.

We are initiating a project to produce semi-washed and/or honey-processed coffee with producers to offer a differentiated coffee in terms of quality and environmental friendliness. By implementing these coffee processing methods, our goal is to reduce water consumption and, in turn, decrease environmental impact, as coffee water has a high organic load and acidic pH that affects the environment.

Field Notes

In Peru, during the month of December, the harvests were completed, and the farms are now in a resting stage. In the higher areas, the last cherries were collected as part of sanitary activities commonly known as “raspa.” Additionally, producers take advantage of this period to carry out farm maintenance activities such as weeding, pruning, thinning, and working on nurseries. The weather in the country has been characterized by heavy rains in the north and rainy days with occasional sun and intense heat on the coasts, which has not posed problems for the crops.

Coffee growers from both the Northern and Southern regions, recognized for their efforts, worked hand in hand with PECA for most of the month to sample their plots and obtain soil samples for a comprehensive Soil Analysis. With this analysis, they can plan for the 2024 campaign, further improving quality and increasing production, making it more profitable and beneficial.

The current challenges faced by producers include rains in some areas during fruit setting, the high cost of fertilizers, and the incidence of some coffee diseases. These challenges are being addressed through farmer training focused on working with what they have, considering the ongoing high prices of fertilizers and elevated labor costs.

Regarding quality, we anticipate an improvement in the 2024 campaign and higher volumes, as our producer friends are in the process of adapting and improving fermentation techniques, drying, and various post-harvest techniques.

The political situation is currently calm, and we hope it remains so. However, in terms of the family economic level, the economy is in recession due to various negative political factors. The cost of fertilizers has decreased, but labor costs for farmers still remain high.

Next Steps

In January, coffee growers in the high-altitude areas, above 1,800 meters above sea level, will begin fertilizing for maintenance, cherry filling, and optimal plant production (adding nitrogen and potassium to their fertilization).

In the mid-altitude areas, between 1,550 and 1,750 meters above sea level, they will be monitoring and controlling coffee borer. They also perform tasks such as weeding and pruning. PECA will start gathering information from some producers to monitor their work, assess weaknesses and shortcomings on the farm for improvement. However, we also observe and highlight their strengths to encourage them to enhance their practices. Technical assistance will be provided in soil fertility management, coffee borer control, and the beginning of production estimation to have a more accurate diagnosis for the 2024 campaign. Additionally, workshops and training sessions on pest and disease topics will be scheduled to help prevent or control potential issues. The idea is to ensure that the producer is prepared to face such situations, preventing any negative impact on the harvest.

The quality team concludes the processes, assurances, and final shipments of the 2023 harvest, preparing methodologies for training their team in sensory and physical analysis. The PECA team also participates to provide instruction on basic procedures for quality cupping evaluation.

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