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With this harvest dashboard, we aim to keep you informed about the status of the harvest in each of the seven origins where Caravela operates, providing you with valuable information that will help you stay up to date of what’s happening on-the-ground.

Please visit this page frequently as we will be updating it at least once a month. If you have any specific questions, do not hesitate to contact us directly!


Last Update December 15, 2020

 


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

The harvest in Mexico is advancing in 10% in the lower parts of the region of Oaxaca and 5% in Chiapas. Thus far, we can see a good and optimal development of the beans. Coffee growers are harvesting the first pickings of the harvest and preparing for the bigger volumes coming up soon in the next months. Additionally, they’re also preparing their post-harvest, drying and storage infrastructure before the harvest peak. The harvest looks to be very healthy, the percentage of leaf rust has been very low, but it can increase if the rainy weather continues within the next days. The quality and volumes expected for this year are very similar to last year’s harvest. Due to COVID-19, coffee growers are expecting to have a labor deficit that may affect the pickings, but we hope it doesn’t affect the final quality. We expect to start shipping coffee from the 2021/2020 harvest by the end of March and beginnings of April 2021. The QC team continues with their calibration process to make sure they start the harvest off on the right foot. On the other hand, PECA is getting all the information of farms to continue with our own organic supply chain project. We expect to receive the first dry parchment lots at our purchasing stations by end of December.

 


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

The harvest continues the maturation stage, and repining level depending on the region and altitude. It has been challenging few weeks for the country and the coffee growers. No damage to homes, dry mills or others was reported. Likewise, no cracked open or overhydrated cherries were reported that could affect quality. Crop year 2020-2021 is promising thanks to a strong chain of producers and strategic partnerships established in Guatemala. The harvest estimate has been finalized and producers are more confident about how they will distribute or allocate their coffee production as it provides security for both coffee growers and roasters alike. Despite everything, we are still present on the field. Certain communities now have flexible covid-19 access measures, which has allowed PECA and Country Manager to visit producers that are in remote areas of the country. Coffee plantations have received more rains than expected directly related to the impact of hurricanes Eta and Iota. In Guatemala, the most affected area was the eastern part of the country, departments such as Chiquimula, El Progreso and Zacapa where we are present. There have been losses of shade trees, damage to main road and bridges, and some small town are uncommunicated. However, most of the producers in the western region do not report significant damage to the crop. The least affected area was the department of San Marcos where there was only overcast and rainy days, Quetzaltenango had damage to highways and roads, and in Huehuetenango producers reported some flooding and damage to roads as well. The government and local authorities have sent machinery and support to initiate certain repairs on key access roads. Currently, our focus is to provide certainty to growers in these challenging times by partnering with roasters through forward contracts that not only help farmers as they provide financial security, but also provide great opportunities for roasters to take advantage of existing relationships and thus secure exceptional coffees. Coffee producers are receiving assistance on CBB control especially in low-lying areas where the harvest will start shortly towards the end of November. During the month of December, constant monitoring and control with fungicide has been recommended by PECA to reduce the impact on pets and diseases. Also, producers are finishing machine calibrations and repairs to be 100% ready. Likewise, we are already beginning to receive sample offers to learn about new profiles and start quality verification with new partners of their first pickings.


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

The ripening of the coffee looks very promising, which is also linked to the fertilizations and good management that many producers have been doing. Currently, we see Chalatenango area can experience a ripening acceleration due to the rains of the last weeks which can change the peak harvest for some producers. The good news is that no significant production losses occurred due to rains in Chalatenango. Ahuachapán, on the other hand, does reflect a 3% drop in fruit. Another concern is the increased incidence of coffee berry borer (CBB) and coffee leaf rust caused by the abrupt changes in humidity and temperature recently experienced recently. Due to the current crop statues growth and maturation, PECA recommendations are focused on cultural management such as cleaning pick up, shade control and application of products that do not affect cup quality. The harvest will begin the first week of December in the lowlands of Ahuachapán region at farms located between 1200 and 1300 MASL. On the other hand, in the lower areas of Chalatenango, we expect the first picking to begin in between early and mid-December. Due to its geographical position and because Hurricane Eta and Iota entered through the Caribbean Sea, El Salvador has been one of the least affected origins. The producers and the PECA team mostly reparteed increased rainfall and soil saturation. The main concern now is the damage to access roads since it directly affects the mobility of producers, access to farms and sale of coffee. However, we still need to wait to see how the climate conditions evolve as we approach the harvest. In recent months, great efforts have been made to ensure the flow of coffee. We continue to look for roasters who are to establish installment contracts and take advantage of already established relationships or support producer groups. Forward contracts have a direct and positive impact on the financial security of coffee growers, since they allow to forecast and invest in with more confidence once the harvests begin, which provides peace of mind to them, their families and communities in these uncertain times. On top of this, it helps roasters secure ahead of time outstanding coffees from El Salvador. Also, PECA continues to provide personalized technical assistance and on-site training. This month PECA and QC team will have field schools with producers and will keep reviewing details before starting the harvest. Producers are finishing repairing the drying infrastructure, calibrating machinery and preparing the farms for this new crop. Stay tuned for what’s brewing in El Salvador.


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

The harvest is taking off, especially in Jinotega and Matagalpa where the harvest usually starts earlier than the rest of the country. The flow of coffee arriving to our drying station in Jinotega is continuing to increase, and we will soon start to receive wet parchment at La Estrella in Nueva Segovia. The development and maturation of the coffee continues its regular process, but the strong rains will probably speed up the maturation process and coffee growers would have to adjust and prepare to harvest the coffee. The two category 4, ETA and IOTA hurricanes left more than 63,300 people affected. The coffee growing areas in Nicaragua were affected by its very strong rains, growth of river basins, and many regions report damages in their access roads and infrastructure. Fortunately, coffee growing farms do not report catastrophic or significative damages that could potentially affect the quality of their harvest. We’ve started to analyze and cup the first lots of the 2020/2021 harvest in Jinotega and their scores are around 83 and 84 points. Being the very first lots of the harvest, these coffees have low complexity, but as the harvest peak arrives, coffees start to show more expression and character, sweet and complex. As it’s tradition, we are preparing our first container of the harvest to Australia.


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

New Harvest cycle has already started in all regions within Huila having a 10% crop advance while Tolima being slightly behind with 5%. The Huila harvest is expected to be of similar size as last year while in Tolima might be seeing a small decrease of 5% due to last years abundant and great harvest. The last pickings in Nariño and Cauca took place during the first half of November and the crop will soon be over.With the two hurricanes that hit Central America, ETA & IOTA, rains have increased over the last two weeks over the entire country. The Traditional Coffee Axis and northern parts of the country have seen flash flooding and some impact to farmers in those regions have been reported. Farmers in the south of the country are seeing an increase in drying times of 5-8 days more. Picking have consistently increased, and quality remains consistent and very similar to last harvest.With the side effects of an increase in rains landslides and flash floods are reported across regions affecting transportation from warehouses to the mill and from the dry mill to the port. Caravela continues to work to mitigate the impact of potential disruptions.


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

Crop is over on continental Ecuador and farmers are delivering last dried batches. Arrivals to the warehouses will continue for the next 2 weeks before they start focusing on post-harvest activities. PECA is currently assessing the real impact of the late summer flowering seen in some farms in the south and north of the country that could produce a fly crop for March-April. Parallel to this, Galapagos farmers report the start of phytosanitary pickings as they get ready for the upcoming harvest.Despite the different challenges faced this year by farmers and Caravela this year volumes delivered by farmers increased double digit vs 2019. Additional to this, cup quality continues being very consistent during the end of the harvest and it is proof how the support Caravela provides to producers pays off.

However, size of beans this year has been smaller than in 2019 due to a lack in rains in the peak of the harvest and lower fertilization usage during preharvest given different COVID restrictions.
The local team is working close to 24/7 to ensure all shipments are met as per contracts despite restrictions by local governments on the amount of staff that can be present at the same time in our facilities. Shipments will continue well into December as coffee continues to be processed and some late contracts and needs come in.

Galapagos coffee is currently being contracted with over 35% of the available volume already committed.


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

Harvest is over in Peru, there is still parchment being held by middlemen who are looking for bidders. We continue to purchase some small lots (under 100kg) from our farmer partners at higher altitudes. Our Jaen station is expected to stop receiving coffee by the end of November. The flowerings at farms from 1500 to 1700 meters above sea level were very healthy and abundant. Because of this, we estimate an increase of 10 and 20% of volumes. Flowerings at farms above 1800 MASL we also expect an increase in volumes for next year but from 5 to 10%.Last pre-shipment samples have been sent and now the entire team is focused on milling. We are aiming to ship everything before the third week of December to avoid congestions at port.

With this harvest dashboard, we aim to keep you informed about the status of the harvest in each of the seven origins where Caravela operates, providing you with valuable information that will help you stay up to date of what’s happening on-the-ground.

Please visit this page frequently as we will be updating it at least once a month. If you have any specific questions, do not hesitate to contact us directly!


Last Update December 15, 2020

 

The Facts

The harvest in Mexico is advancing in 10% in the lower parts of the region of Oaxaca and 5% in Chiapas. Thus far, we can see a good and optimal development of the beans. Coffee growers are harvesting the first pickings of the harvest and preparing for the bigger volumes coming up soon in the next months. Additionally, they’re also preparing their post-harvest, drying and storage infrastructure before the harvest peak.

 

Our Take

The harvest looks to be very healthy, the percentage of leaf rust has been very low, but it can increase if the rainy weather continues within the next days. The quality and volumes expected for this year are very similar to last year’s harvest. Due to COVID-19, coffee growers are expecting to have a labor deficit that may affect the pickings, but we hope it doesn’t affect the final quality.

 

Next Steps

We expect to start shipping coffee from the 2021/2020 harvest by the end of March and beginnings of April 2021. The QC team continues with their calibration process to make sure they start the harvest off on the right foot. On the other hand, PECA is getting all the information of farms to continue with our own organic supply chain project. We expect to receive the first dry parchment lots at our purchasing stations by end of December.

 

 

The Facts

The harvest continues the maturation stage, and repining level depending on the region and altitude. It has been challenging few weeks for the country and the coffee growers. No damage to homes, dry mills or others was reported. Likewise, no cracked open or overhydrated cherries were reported that could affect quality. Crop year 2020-2021 is promising thanks to a strong chain of producers and strategic partnerships established in Guatemala. The harvest estimate has been finalized and producers are more confident about how they will distribute or allocate their coffee production as it provides security for both coffee growers and roasters alike. Despite everything, we are still present on the field. Certain communities now have flexible covid-19 access measures, which has allowed PECA and Country Manager to visit producers that are in remote areas of the country.

Our Take

Coffee plantations have received more rains than expected directly related to the impact of hurricanes Eta and Iota. In Guatemala, the most affected area was the eastern part of the country, departments such as Chiquimula, El Progreso and Zacapa where we are present. There have been losses of shade trees, damage to main road and bridges, and some small town are uncommunicated. However, most of the producers in the western region do not report significant damage to the crop. The least affected area was the department of San Marcos where there was only overcast and rainy days, Quetzaltenango had damage to highways and roads, and in Huehuetenango producers reported some flooding and damage to roads as well. The government and local authorities have sent machinery and support to initiate certain repairs on key access roads.

Next Steps

Currently, our focus is to provide certainty to growers in these challenging times by partnering with roasters through forward contracts that not only help farmers as they provide financial security, but also provide great opportunities for roasters to take advantage of existing relationships and thus secure exceptional coffees. Coffee producers are receiving assistance on CBB control especially in low-lying areas where the harvest will start shortly towards the end of November. During the month of December, constant monitoring and control with fungicide has been recommended by PECA to reduce the impact on pets and diseases. Also, producers are finishing machine calibrations and repairs to be 100% ready. Likewise, we are already beginning to receive sample offers to learn about new profiles and start quality verification with new partners of their first pickings.

The Facts

The ripening of the coffee looks very promising, which is also linked to the fertilizations and good management that many producers have been doing. Currently, we see Chalatenango area can experience a ripening acceleration due to the rains of the last weeks which can change the peak harvest for some producers. The good news is that no significant production losses occurred due to rains in Chalatenango. Ahuachapán, on the other hand, does reflect a 3% drop in fruit. Another concern is the increased incidence of coffee berry borer (CBB) and coffee leaf rust caused by the abrupt changes in humidity and temperature recently experienced recently. Due to the current crop statues growth and maturation, PECA recommendations are focused on cultural management such as cleaning pick up, shade control and application of products that do not affect cup quality.

Our Take

The harvest will begin the first week of December in the lowlands of Ahuachapán region at farms located between 1200 and 1300 MASL. On the other hand, in the lower areas of Chalatenango, we expect the first picking to begin in between early and mid-December. Due to its geographical position and because Hurricane Eta and Iota entered through the Caribbean Sea, El Salvador has been one of the least affected origins. The producers and the PECA team mostly reparteed increased rainfall and soil saturation. The main concern now is the damage to access roads since it directly affects the mobility of producers, access to farms and sale of coffee. However, we still need to wait to see how the climate conditions evolve as we approach the harvest.

Next Steps

In recent months, great efforts have been made to ensure the flow of coffee. We continue to look for roasters who are to establish installment contracts and take advantage of already established relationships or support producer groups. Forward contracts have a direct and positive impact on the financial security of coffee growers, since they allow to forecast and invest in with more confidence once the harvests begin, which provides peace of mind to them, their families and communities in these uncertain times. On top of this, it helps roasters secure ahead of time outstanding coffees from El Salvador. Also, PECA continues to provide personalized technical assistance and on-site training. This month PECA and QC team will have field schools with producers and will keep reviewing details before starting the harvest. Producers are finishing repairing the drying infrastructure, calibrating machinery and preparing the farms for this new crop. Stay tuned for what’s brewing in El Salvador.

The Facts

The harvest is taking off, especially in Jinotega and Matagalpa where the harvest usually starts earlier than the rest of the country. The flow of coffee arriving to our drying station in Jinotega is continuing to increase, and we will soon start to receive wet parchment at La Estrella in Nueva Segovia. The development and maturation of the coffee continues its regular process, but the strong rains will probably speed up the maturation process and coffee growers would have to adjust and prepare to harvest the coffee.

Our Take

The two category 4, ETA and IOTA hurricanes left more than 63,300 people affected. The coffee growing areas in Nicaragua were affected by its very strong rains, growth of river basins, and many regions report damages in their access roads and infrastructure. Fortunately, coffee growing farms do not report catastrophic or significative damages that could potentially affect the quality of their harvest.

Next Steps

We’ve started to analyze and cup the first lots of the 2020/2021 harvest in Jinotega and their scores are around 83 and 84 points. Being the very first lots of the harvest, these coffees have low complexity, but as the harvest peak arrives, coffees start to show more expression and character, sweet and complex. As it’s tradition, we are preparing our first container of the harvest to Australia.

The Facts

New Harvest cycle has already started in all regions within Huila having a 10% crop advance while Tolima being slightly behind with 5%. The Huila harvest is expected to be of similar size as last year while in Tolima might be seeing a small decrease of 5% due to last years abundant and great harvest. The last pickings in Nariño and Cauca took place during the first half of November and the crop will soon be over.

Our Take

With the two hurricanes that hit Central America, ETA & IOTA, rains have increased over the last two weeks over the entire country. The Traditional Coffee Axis and northern parts of the country have seen flash flooding and some impact to farmers in those regions have been reported. Farmers in the south of the country are seeing an increase in drying times of 5-8 days more. Picking have consistently increased, and quality remains consistent and very similar to last harvest.

Next Steps

With the side effects of an increase in rains landslides and flash floods are reported across regions affecting transportation from warehouses to the mill and from the dry mill to the port. Caravela continues to work to mitigate the impact of potential disruptions.

The Facts

Crop is over on continental Ecuador and farmers are delivering last dried batches. Arrivals to the warehouses will continue for the next 2 weeks before they start focusing on post-harvest activities. PECA is currently assessing the real impact of the late summer flowering seen in some farms in the south and north of the country that could produce a fly crop for March-April. Parallel to this, Galapagos farmers report the start of phytosanitary pickings as they get ready for the upcoming harvest.

Our Take

Despite the different challenges faced this year by farmers and Caravela this year volumes delivered by farmers increased double digit vs 2019. Additional to this, cup quality continues being very consistent during the end of the harvest and it is proof how the support Caravela provides to producers pays off.

However, size of beans this year has been smaller than in 2019 due to a lack in rains in the peak of the harvest and lower fertilization usage during preharvest given different COVID restrictions.

Next Steps

The local team is working close to 24/7 to ensure all shipments are met as per contracts despite restrictions by local governments on the amount of staff that can be present at the same time in our facilities. Shipments will continue well into December as coffee continues to be processed and some late contracts and needs come in.

Galapagos coffee is currently being contracted with over 35% of the available volume already committed.

The Facts

Harvest is over in Peru, there is still parchment being held by middlemen who are looking for bidders. We continue to purchase some small lots (under 100kg) from our farmer partners at higher altitudes. Our Jaen station is expected to stop receiving coffee by the end of November.

Our Take

The flowerings at farms from 1500 to 1700 meters above sea level were very healthy and abundant. Because of this, we estimate an increase of 10 and 20% of volumes. Flowerings at farms above 1800 MASL we also expect an increase in volumes for next year but from 5 to 10%.

Next Steps

Last pre-shipment samples have been sent and now the entire team is focused on milling. We are aiming to ship everything before the third week of December to avoid congestions at port.

Calendar

Mexico

El Salvador
Colombia

Galapagos

Guatemala

Nicaragua

Ecuador

Peru

Mexico

El Salvador
Colombia

Galapagos

Guatemala

Nicaragua

Ecuador

Peru

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