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With this harvest dashboard, we aim to keep you informed about the status of the harvest in each of the seven origins where Caravela operates, providing you with valuable information that will help you stay up to date of what’s happening on-the-ground.

Please visit this page frequently as we will be updating it at least once a month. If you have any specific questions, do not hesitate to contact us directly!


Last Update August 06, 2020

 


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

Cherries in Mexico continue developing. On farms at lower altitudes (1200-1500 MASL) these cherries are currently in the 18th week of development. Coffee trees on farms at altitudes from 1600 to 2000 are in their 9th week of cherry development.

Coffee growers are currently working on the nutrition plans for their coffee trees to guarantee proper development of the fruit. However, a large part of the nutrition and fertilization plans that were initially planned, were affected, and reduced due to the current pandemic. Fertilizations weren’t carried out at their 100% so we will probably see smaller coffee beans and lower yields in the production for next harvest.
The next harvest’s predicted behavior will be very similar to that of the last harvest. We expect a 20% volume reduction for the harvest in Oaxaca compared to the 2019-2020 cycle.

Due to the lack of labor because of the COVID-19 Pandemic restrictions, farmers have only been able to carry out 70% of their farm activities which could have consequences for proper development of the beans, creating nutritional issues, resulting in the possible presence of leaf rust.
We have just started a series of workshops in the region of Oaxaca with our PECA and QC teams to educate coffee producers on improving the cup quality of their coffee.

We have been carrying out technical visits to farms, helping coffee growers take care and preparing their coffee trees for next harvest. For example, we are training them on how to create organic fertilizers and how to apply them.

Additionally, we are working on introducing all our farmer partners to Arabica TM in order to have much better traceability of each farm, each coffee lot, and each coffee producer.

With the community lockdowns and the closing of access roads, it has been challenging to visit and follow up on some of these coffee growers, but when we can we look forward to continuing with this process, showing our support to all our coffee growering partners.

 


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

The coffee cherry development in Chiquimula, San Marcos and Huehuetenango has been homogeneous, and coffee plants will enter the 3rd stage of development in relation to the first flowering records. At this stage, coffee plantations are more susceptible to diseases such as coffee berry borer; therefore, producers are working on integrated pest management. 85% of the producers have implemented the fertilization plan, 5% have applied other types of traditional management due to input shortage, and 10% suffered delays with fertilization plans due to constant rainfall. So far, 85% of the farms have carried out ethological controls, and 100% of the farms have carried out preventive controls for coffee leaf rust.We haven’t seen any problems in crop development. However, high rainfall is expected in the upcoming months in the country, so farm action plans are focused on the 2nd fertilization. On the other hand, due to the increase in Covid-19 cases, there has been restrictions in some municipalities, which has impeded the PECA team from visiting some farmers. In other places, communities allow entry only between 6:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m., after that no one can leave or enter. This has caused an estimated labor deficit of 50%. Currently, the possibility of withholding access is being analyzed, producers have created working shifts to patrol main entrances and distribute workload while being able to work on farms.Despite the current limitations and restrictions, 42% of producers have received on-site visits from PECA, following the biosecurity protocol and distancing recommendations. Visits are focused on emphasizing integrated pest and disease management. Also 48% of coffee growers that we work with have already registered to our new app, Arabica TM. We are expecting this to reach 100% by the end of the month. All producers will receive training to use the app, track harvest progress, and manage farm activities, starting this harvest. Quality and PECA teams have finished harvest reports which lay the groundwork for new plans and improvements and to support farmers through the use of technology and on-site visits when possible. The team is also receiving training on sustainability, certifications, and other courses focused on creating agile processes, helping us be closer to all coffee producers within our network.


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

Coffee continues to develop, most cherries are between 90 and 100 days of growth, that is, almost completing the 2nd formation stage and about to commence the 3rd stage when the seed if fully formed. The PECA team continues to visit coffee growers in Chalatenango and Ahuachapán, reporting that 1% to 2% of the cherries have fallen due to Amanda's climate depression, experienced last month, resulting in water saturation in the cherry and strong winds. 75% of the producers indicate that they will apply 3 rounds of fertilizer to coffee plantations while 25% will only carry out 2 rounds. This is driven by the limited resources and the increase in prices for inputs.Over the past weeks, climate conditions have been fluctuating. The Chalatenango area has experienced constant rainfall, on average 3-4 days per week while Ahuachapán 2-3 days per week. Overall, we have seen a 7% incidence of coffee berry borer. Producers expect to face higher temperatures in September which can increase outbreaks of this disease. The PECA team is working with coffee growers on the implementation of traditional traps matched with allowed products to control further outbreaks, which not only affects cup quality but also yields. 65% of producers are concerned about the economic impact of Covid-19 in the country. As transportation is limited, it is challenging for workers to access farms, and it will affect labor availability for the next harvest.The PECA team continues supporting producers by monitoring the crop and creating farm management plans to maintain or improve quality and yields based on post-harvest feedback. Additionally, PECA and QC team are receiving training on sustainability, certifications, and on the best practices to address these topics. As of now, 26% of producers have received a Cost of Production Tracker and 53% have received the Coffee Compass, two educational and management tools created by Caravela. One to track costs and expenses, and the other to understand how much coffee growers invest in producing specialty coffee. In addition, Arabica TM recently launched and will provide knowledge to implement new agricultural practices, have better control and a more organized workflow.


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

The weather has been favorable for the second stage of growth and development of coffee. At the moment, the country is in the "canícula" stage, a period from July to early September, when the warm weather in the northern hemisphere leads to a dry period in Nicaragua. Coffee growers in Nueva Segovia continue to do integrated pest and disease management and weeding as constant rains over the past week accelerated their growth. In Jinotega and Matagalpa, coffee growers continue to prepare primarily for a second round of fertilization, controlling small outbreaks of coffee leaf rust and implementing traditional traps for the coffee berry borer.Despite the current challenges in the country, Nicaraguan producers have doubled their efforts to grow coffee. Compared to 2019, the weather has been better this year allowing the coffee growth cycle to continue without any major disruption. Therefore, the availability of water and water stress have been balanced with the needs of the coffee trees. The quality control team also provided producers with post-harvest feedback. The PECA team has returned to the fields, visiting the farmers, and supporting them in fertilization and with action plans to improve quality. The PECA team reports a low incidence of coffee leaf rust in all the regions where we are present.With the official launch of our new app Arabica TM in Nicaragua, the team has been helping producers create accounts and training them on how to use the app to self-manage activities on the farm, such as flowering dates, fertilization, pest, and disease control, among others things. We are taking advantage of the off-season time and have provided the PECA and the QC teams in-house training on sustainability and other courses aimed at increasing knowledge and acquiring new skills to better serve coffee growers.

Other activities linked with mill maintenance, export services planning, and accounting, are being carried out.


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

The harvest continues to advance in the country with all the southern regions at the peak of the harvest. Farmers are reporting crop advance and pickings in Tolima of over 80% with Huila close to 55% and Nariño and Cauca at about 60%. These lots will start arriving to buying units and warehouses in about 3-4 weeks once drying is completed. Small first batches are also being reported from the center and north of the country as they start getting ready for their main harvest in a few weeks.Due to heavy demand from exporters, internal prices are at the highest level in the last 4 years with coffee being bought over 1 million pesos/carga. Farmers are not storing any coffee trying to take advantage of current prices. Rainy Weather has arrived in Cauca and Nariño affecting drying times while it remains dry in Tolima and Huila. Quality has been so far very consistent in all regions with most lots scoring close to 85.Between family labor, mingas and community pickers most coffee has been harvested with no mayor problems and logistical challenges have been eased in most producing regions with some small restrictions in Cauca. As the Tolima harvest is close to finish, PECA is closely monitoring the next harvest period that should start around mid- September. So far farmers report a similar volume compared to 2019. We estimate availability of coffee for the second semester at, at least, 5% more than previous year but with farmers continuing to ask for very high prices.


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

Crop advance is at over 70% in the northern regions while in the south of the country farmers report a 50% advance. Lots have started arriving in all warehouses with a steady increase of volumes, week after week and solid qualities.Drying times continue to be longer than expected with about 25-30 days for most farmers. Despite a good flow of coffee, longer drying times have stalled final arrivals of lots to warehouses.With lots arriving to our warehouses both type and offer samples have been sent to customers during the last month. As contracts are being finalized about 50% of commitments for the year have been confirmed with shipments to start at the end of September. As the available volumes become less and less, if you are interested in this origin please reach out to your sales representative.


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

With over 400k Covid cases reported in the country, Cajamarca and Cusco are still under 5k cases each. After opening the borders and lifting the strict lockdown for a couple of weeks, cases had a surge spike making the government to re-establish the strict lockdown in those regions again. Coffee supply chains are secure (production, transportation, and commercial activities). As of now, fear is driving the producers’ decisions making, most of them are consolidating volumes at farms before delivering, to limit their exposure due to constant traveling. Harvest progress in Cajamarca is currently at 55% and Cusco is at 40%. Samples are showing the quality is going to be promising and the first lots will be delivered starting next week.Rainy weather is affecting drying times and creating some quality problems in the northern region. The sunny days we have been experiencing lately have been helpful to reverse the effects and minimize the damage. PECA is constantly providing guidance to farmers on how to tackle the issues. We are working with the producer leaders to consolidate cargos and avoid multiple trips made by large groups of people. Quality is getting better despite the issues related to rainy weather, we have been receiving solid RTBs and seeing an increase in A and AA grades.Type samples are on the way to all our sales offices. We are seeing a non-covid related reduction in volumes vs last year as a direct result of the global price crisis, we estimate that this could go up to 20%. Additionally, and as a result of the lockdowns, the harvest in Selva Central (about 40% of the total production) was severely impacted. This is because the peak of harvest was at the beginning of the Covid crisis and the strict government policies that came into play then did not classify coffee as a key product. The majority of commercial grade coffee exporters are desperate to cover their shorts in other regions, such as Cajamarca and Cusco, impacting the price dynamics and affecting the specialty market as well.

With this harvest dashboard, we aim to keep you informed about the status of the harvest in each of the seven origins where Caravela operates, providing you with valuable information that will help you stay up to date of what’s happening on-the-ground. 

Please visit this page frequently as we will be updating it at least once a month. If you have any specific questions, do not hesitate to contact us directly!

The Facts

Cherries in Mexico continue developing. On farms at lower altitudes (1200-1500 MASL) these cherries are currently in the 18th week of development. Coffee trees on farms at altitudes from 1600 to 2000 are in their 9th week of cherry development.

Coffee growers are currently working on the nutrition plans for their coffee trees to guarantee proper development of the fruit. However, a large part of the nutrition and fertilization plans that were initially planned, were affected, and reduced due to the current pandemic. Fertilizations weren’t carried out at their 100% so we will probably see smaller coffee beans and lower yields in the production for next harvest.

Our Take

The next harvest’s predicted behavior will be very similar to that of the last harvest. We expect a 20% volume reduction for the harvest in Oaxaca compared to the 2019-2020 cycle.

Due to the lack of labor because of the COVID-19 Pandemic restrictions, farmers have only been able to carry out 70% of their farm activities which could have consequences for proper development of the beans, creating nutritional issues, resulting in the possible presence of leaf rust.

Next Steps

We have just started a series of workshops in the region of Oaxaca with our PECA and QC teams to educate coffee producers on improving the cup quality of their coffee.

We have been carrying out technical visits to farms, helping coffee growers take care and preparing their coffee trees for next harvest. For example, we are training them on how to create organic fertilizers and how to apply them.

Additionally, we are working on introducing all our farmer partners to Arabica TM in order to have much better traceability of each farm, each coffee lot, and each coffee producer.

With the community lockdowns and the closing of access roads, it has been challenging to visit and follow up on some of these coffee growers, but when we can we look forward to continuing with this process, showing our support to all our coffee growering partners.

 

 

The Facts

The coffee cherry development in Chiquimula, San Marcos and Huehuetenango has been homogeneous, and coffee plants will enter the 3rd stage of development in relation to the first flowering records. At this stage, coffee plantations are more susceptible to diseases such as coffee berry borer; therefore, producers are working on integrated pest management. 85% of the producers have implemented the fertilization plan, 5% have applied other types of traditional management due to input shortage, and 10% suffered delays with fertilization plans due to constant rainfall. So far, 85% of the farms have carried out ethological controls, and 100% of the farms have carried out preventive controls for coffee leaf rust. 

Our Take

We haven’t seen any problems in crop development. However, high rainfall is expected in the upcoming months in the country, so farm action plans are focused on the 2nd fertilization. On the other hand, due to the increase in Covid-19 cases, there has been restrictions in some municipalities, which has impeded the PECA team from visiting some farmers. In other places, communities allow entry only between 6:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m., after that no one can leave or enter. This has caused an estimated labor deficit of 50%. Currently, the possibility of withholding access is being analyzed, producers have created working shifts to patrol main entrances and distribute workload while being able to work on farms. 

 

 

Next Steps

Despite the current limitations and restrictions, 42% of producers have received on-site visits from PECA, following the biosecurity protocol and distancing recommendations. Visits are focused on emphasizing integrated pest and disease management. Also 48% of coffee growers that we work with have already registered to our new app, Arabica TM. We are expecting this to reach 100% by the end of the month. All producers will receive training to use the app, track harvest progress, and manage farm activities, starting this harvest. Quality and PECA teams have finished harvest reports which lay the groundwork for new plans and improvements and to support farmers through the use of technology and on-site visits when possible. The team is also receiving training on sustainability, certifications, and other courses focused on creating agile processes, helping us be closer to all coffee producers within our network. 

 

The Facts

Coffee continues to develop, most cherries are between 90 and 100 days of growth, that is, almost completing the 2nd formation stage and about to commence the 3rd stage when the seed if fully formed. The PECA team continues to visit coffee growers in Chalatenango and Ahuachapán, reporting that 1% to 2% of the cherries have fallen due to Amanda’s climate depression, experienced last month, resulting in water saturation in the cherry and strong winds. 75% of the producers indicate that they will apply 3 rounds of fertilizer to coffee plantations while 25% will only carry out 2 rounds. This is driven by the limited resources and the increase in prices for inputs. 

Our Take

Over the past weeks, climate conditions have been fluctuating. The Chalatenango area has experienced constant rainfall, on average 3-4 days per week while Ahuachapán 2-3 days per week. Overall, we have seen a 7% incidence of coffee berry borer. Producers expect to face higher temperatures in September which can increase outbreaks of this disease. The PECA team is working with coffee growers on the implementation of traditional traps matched with allowed products to control further outbreaks, which not only affects cup quality but also yields. 65% of producers are concerned about the economic impact of Covid-19 in the country. As transportation is limited, it is challenging for workers to access farms, and it will affect labor availability for the next harvest.

Next Steps

The PECA team continues supporting producers by monitoring the crop and creating farm management plans to maintain or improve quality and yields based on post-harvest feedback. Additionally, PECA and QC team are receiving training on sustainability, certifications, and on the best practices to address these topics. As of now, 26% of producers have received a Cost of Production Tracker and 53% have received the Coffee Compass, two educational and management tools created by Caravela. One to track costs and expenses, and the other to understand how much coffee growers invest in producing specialty coffee. In addition, Arabica TM recently launched and will provide knowledge to implement new agricultural practices, have better control and a more organized workflow.

The Facts

The weather has been favorable for the second stage of growth and development of coffee. At the moment, the country is in the “canícula” stage, a period from July to early September, when the warm weather in the northern hemisphere leads to a dry period in Nicaragua. Coffee growers in Nueva Segovia continue to do integrated pest and disease management and weeding as constant rains over the past week accelerated their growth. In Jinotega and Matagalpa, coffee growers continue to prepare primarily for a second round of fertilization, controlling small outbreaks of coffee leaf rust and implementing traditional traps for the coffee berry borer. 

Our Take

Despite the current challenges in the country, Nicaraguan producers have doubled their efforts to grow coffee. Compared to 2019, the weather has been better this year allowing the coffee growth cycle to continue without any major disruption. Therefore, the availability of water and water stress have been balanced with the needs of the coffee trees. The quality control team also provided producers with post-harvest feedback. The PECA team has returned to the fields, visiting the farmers, and supporting them in fertilization and with action plans to improve quality. The PECA team reports a low incidence of coffee leaf rust in all the regions where we are present.

 

Next Steps

With the official launch of our new app Arabica TM in Nicaragua, the team has been helping producers create accounts and training them on how to use the app to self-manage activities on the farm, such as flowering dates, fertilization, pest, and disease control, among others things. We are taking advantage of the off-season time and have  provided the PECA and the QC teams in-house training on sustainability and other courses aimed at increasing knowledge and acquiring new skills to better serve coffee growers.

Other activities linked with mill maintenance, export services planning, and accounting, are being carried out.  

The Facts

The harvest continues to advance in the country with all the southern regions at the peak of the harvest. Farmers are reporting crop advance and pickings in Tolima of over 80% with Huila close to 55% and Nariño and Cauca at about 60%. These lots will start arriving to buying units and warehouses in about 3-4 weeks once drying is completed. Small first batches are also being reported from the center and north of the country as they start getting ready for their main harvest in a few weeks.

Our Take

Due to heavy demand from exporters, internal prices are at the highest level in the last 4 years with coffee being bought over 1 million pesos/carga. Farmers are not storing any coffee trying to take advantage of current prices. Rainy Weather has arrived in Cauca and Nariño affecting drying times while it remains dry in Tolima and Huila. Quality has been so far very consistent in all regions with most lots scoring close to 85.

Next Steps

Between family labor, mingas and community pickers most coffee has been harvested with no mayor problems and logistical challenges have been eased in most producing regions with some small restrictions in Cauca. As the Tolima harvest is close to finish, PECA is closely monitoring the next harvest period that should start around mid- September. So far farmers report a similar volume compared to 2019.  We estimate availability of coffee for the second semester at, at least, 5% more than previous year but with farmers continuing to ask for very high prices.

The Facts

Crop advance is at over 70% in the northern regions while in the south of the country farmers report a 50% advance. Lots have started arriving in all warehouses with a steady increase of volumes, week after week and solid qualities.

Our Take

Drying times continue to be longer than expected with about 25-30 days for most farmers. Despite a good flow of coffee, longer drying times have stalled final arrivals of lots to warehouses.

Next Steps

With lots arriving to our warehouses both type and offer samples have been sent to customers during the last month. As contracts are being finalized about 50% of commitments for the year have been confirmed with shipments to start at the end of September. As the available volumes become less and less, if you are interested in this origin please reach out to your sales representative.

The Facts

With over 400k Covid cases reported in the country, Cajamarca and Cusco are still under 5k cases each. After opening the borders and lifting the strict lockdown for a couple of weeks, cases had a surge spike making the government to re-establish the strict lockdown in those regions again. Coffee supply chains are secure (production, transportation, and commercial activities). As of now, fear is driving the producers’ decisions making, most of them are consolidating volumes at farms before delivering, to limit their exposure due to constant traveling.  Harvest progress in Cajamarca is currently at 55% and Cusco is at 40%. Samples are showing the quality is going to be promising and the first lots will be delivered starting next week.

Our Take

Rainy weather is affecting drying times and creating some quality problems in the northern region. The sunny days we have been experiencing lately have been helpful to reverse the effects and minimize the damage. PECA is constantly providing guidance to farmers on how to tackle the issues. We are working with the producer leaders to consolidate cargos and avoid multiple trips made by large groups of people. Quality is getting better despite the issues related to rainy weather, we have been receiving solid RTBs and seeing an increase in A and AA grades.

Next Steps

Type samples are on the way to all our sales offices. We are seeing a non-covid related reduction in volumes vs last year as a direct result of the global price crisis, we estimate that this could go up to 20%. Additionally, and as a result of the lockdowns, the harvest in Selva Central (about 40% of the total production) was severely impacted.

This is because the peak of harvest was at the beginning of the Covid crisis and the strict government policies that came into play then did not classify coffee as a key product. The majority of commercial grade coffee exporters are desperate to cover their shorts in other regions, such as Cajamarca and Cusco, impacting the price dynamics and affecting the specialty market as well.

Calendar

Mexico

El Salvador
Colombia

Galapagos

Guatemala

Nicaragua

Ecuador

Peru

Mexico

El Salvador
Colombia

Galapagos

Guatemala

Nicaragua

Ecuador

Peru

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