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With this harvest dashboard, we aim to keep you informed about the status of the harvest in each of the seven origins where Caravela operates, providing you with valuable information that will help you stay up to date of what’s happening on-the-ground.

Please visit this page frequently as we will be updating it at least once a month. If you have any specific questions, do not hesitate to contact us directly!


Last Update June 29, 2021

 


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

Cherries are currently developing in Mexico. Coffee growers are currently cleaning their plantations, monitoring, and doing plague and disease control, applying fertilizers, and some of them doing renovations. We expect for the first pickings to start in September for the farms in lower altitudes, in October for the middle-range farms and in November for the higher-altitude farms.If the climate continues as favorable as it goes, and it doesn’t affect the development of the cherries, we expect the quality and volumes to be as good as 2020-2021 harvest.In June, we shipped over 1,200 bags to New York, London, Melbourne, and Houston. Our QC and production teams continue milling and doing quality assurance in full speed to continue shipping our Mexican coffee in July. In the meantime, PECA is visiting coffee growers, giving the respective feedback and recommendations as well as evaluating the next harvest.

 


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

In Guatemala, the flowerings were concentrated in weeks 16 and 17 of this year. There was a second sporadic bloom between weeks 18 to 20. Consequently, in the central plateau, western and eastern departments of the country, cherry development looks promising due to the climatic conditions that favored this growth. Coffee growers are also carrying out tasks such as weed control, pest, and disease monitoring. In some farms, the first fertilization was completed during the first half of this month. To date, the pest and disease incidence have been in a much less decree, not requiring chemical control applications. Nationwide, however, in the farms below 1100 MSNM, there is a strong emphasis on the use of CBB (broca) traps to prevent pest propagation.We have seen firsthand how the producers are willing and motivated to establish fertilization plans. As a result, the PECA team is working hand in hand with the producers in this regard. Quality-wise, the distribution of grades and parchment coffee flow changed due to the volume and coffee deliveries by our current coffee growing partners and new alliances established. Producers additionally delivered more AAA and ML lots including limited lots of varieties such as Pacamara and Geishas. Also, women-led farms have increased, providing availability of limited volumes of this coffee. This effort goes hand in hand with our commitment since 2018 to source more coffee produced by women and new regions such as Quetzaltenango, El Progreso, Baja Verapaz.During this harvest, Guatemala began the third-party verification with Enveritas to understand our impact and to lay the foundations for our continued social and economic impact initiatives in this origin. On the other hand, we are wrapping up coffee exports, especially to the United States and Asia. To date, 86% of the contracted coffee has been shipped out of Guatemala. Logistically, one of the biggest challenges this year was the availability of containers, which made the outbound process more complex, however, thanks to timely responses and proactive actions, we have managed to meet shipping times. Our Quality team is finishing quality assurance and milling. The PECA team is currently on the field monitoring the coffee harvest.


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

To date, there is good fruit development taking place as 90% of the harvest is already curdled. In the Chalatenango area, the most abundant flowering occurred in week 17 and the Ahuachapán area in week 18. Now, coffee growers' main activities are focused on finishing their first fertilization round, weed control, and pest and disease management, especially coffee rust prevention. The PECA team is on the field visiting new producers, who require personalized technical assistance. We see a lot of potential and encouragement on improving quality and productivity.We have not seen major pest and disease problems in Chalatenango or Ahuachapán, however, constant farm monitoring is key to take preventive actions. Compared to the 2020 harvest, this year we see less CBB (Broca) incidence leading to higher quality, cleaner cup, and higher acceptance grade of sample offers. However, due to the temperature changes experienced at the beginning of the year, certain areas and farms had problems, as the cherries dry out when exposed to low temperatures. While this does not have a direct impact on cup quality, it impacts the physical quality of the coffee. Therefore, growers have invested more time in hand sorting or selective harvesting to minimize this effect. Also, the delivery trend shows a broad focus on honey and natural processes, leading to an exponential offer sample increase of both traditional and exotic varieties.Currently, in El Salvador, we have shipped 80% of the contracted coffee to Europe, Australia, Asia, and the United States. We expect to conclude exports at the beginning of July to the United States mainly. The logistics and quality team are working meticulously to complete this process successfully. On the other hand, QC and PECA are conducting quality workshops and visiting farms, both to provide technical assistance and quality feedback.


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

Transparency and consistency have been the cornerstone for our continued work and growth in Nicaragua. Currently, producers have finished with tissue management and have started farm infrastructure maintenance. The rainy period has not fully started in some areas causing some delays with the first fertilization round. Meanwhile, coffee growers continue with pest and disease management. The harvest 2021-2022 in the Nueva Segovia area is estimated to start in December and in Jinotega and Matagalpa area in around mid-November.The quality of this 2020-2021 harvest has been outstanding and very consistent, leading to an increase of A, AA, and RTB grades from this origin. Additionally, productivity has been constant within our network of long-standing partners as well as new producers. We successfully fulfilled all forward and spot contracts now available in our import offices in USA, Europe, Australia, and Asia. This year, Nicaragua also sourced and shipped honey and natural processes by working together with remarkable producers who are eager to innovate and have excellent processing protocols established. This also meant adapting our drying protocols and process at La Estrella and La Concordia dry mill to guarantee quality and manage volume.Now, QC and PECA are visiting coffee producers in Nueva Segovia, Jinotega, and Matagalpa, monitoring the harvest, and providing farmers tailored feedback focused on the achievements accomplished and the areas of opportunities producers have. To date, 89% of all contracted coffee has been exported to Australia, the United States, London, and Belgium. The biggest challenge in exports has been the low influx of ships to Nicaragua, due to socio-political issues and COVID.
Our next shipment is to New York, and in the next month, we plan to complete 100% of our exports to destinations like the United States, Australia, and Japan. This year, despite the challenges, we have had a better container outbound process, which has allowed us to meet shipments and deliveries to destinations on schedule.


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

In Tolima we are at 65% of the harvest while in the northwest of Huila the advance on harvest is at 45% and the south of Huila we are at 30% of progress.This year the harvest will come spread throughout the season, not peaking in any particular month, which is good because it will allow the coffee producers to achieve the adequate times, for the processes, and achieve good results, avoiding a bottleneck in production. The big challenge right now are the prices. Given the high market prices, a 75% - 90% of the coffee has been commercialized humid. This has made much more competitive the market for RTB and A coffees because the producers prefer to save time and work in the drying process for a more profitable price versus the production costs.We are on the process of unraveling the shipments of May and June due to the recent national strike. We’re not yet at the speed we would like to be, but we estimate that by August our shipment projections will be met. Our main challenge is the high price of coffee, which is making coffee producers worry less about producing high quality coffee and making it hard to gather it for us. PECA has been doing an immense job in communicating and educating producers, showing them the importance of this is a long-term business. We are keen to strengthen the commercial relationship with the producers we work with.


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

In the Northern region, the harvest is at 35%. Some producers have already started delivering samples of their first pickings and lots and other fermentation experiments. In the South, the harvest in Zamora has reached a 52%, while in Loja it is just starting; currently at a 13%.We are very pleased in terms of quality. Most producers have maintained or improved their quality, and we haven't seen as much defect issues (phenol, mold) as in previous years. On the other hand, there are regions -like Pichincha, in the North- where climate conditions haven't been very helpful for harvest and drying. The rainy season should've come to an end in the area, but it is still going on.We have been working on creating more sales opportunities, developing new brands and profiles, and starting to develop some limited editions. We are working on calibrations with the quality team. Also, we will be renewing our dry mill equipment soon to be more efficient during production. Our next shipment will take place in August, we'll ship a full container of SPOT offerings to North America, mainly from the South region of Ecuador. At the end of the month, we'll receive the visit of the C.A.F.E. Practices auditing team for the certification of a group of 58 producers.


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

Right the now the harvest it’s divided: 15.3% of progress in the North and 13.74% in the South; starting the first cherry pickings. We are registering intense rain in the North, more than usual, which has had a negative impact on quality. In the South of the country, we have noticed some impact of coffee leave rust and Ojo de Gallo in places with higher humidity; there’s a rise in rain compared to 2020Despite weather conditions, quality seems promising. Yields are still below 72% (screen 15), which is normal considering the timing. First couple of higher grades (AA's) have been purchased at our Jaen station, this shows the effort and extra care producers, members of the PECA Program, put on their coffees. PECA is finishing our organic chain audit and we are expecting to start buying organic coffees next week, right after this, our agronomists will focus on providing support to face the drying difficulties due to the incessant rains in both regions.First sets of samples have been sent to all sales offices to move forward with contracts. Shipments will start on the second half of August along with some SPOT for our sales offices. Quality/PECA teams will continue to provide feedback to producers so they can adjust their post-harvest processes and avoid phenolic/moldy cups as the rainy season could be longer than expected. During this month we have been providing brand new bags to producers so they can use white/clean bags to store their parchment before delivery. PP bags are reusable, and the producers will receive the same number of bags they delivered with coffee so they can use them for the next batch.

With this harvest dashboard, we aim to keep you informed about the status of the harvest in each of the seven origins where Caravela operates, providing you with valuable information that will help you stay up to date of what’s happening on-the-ground.

Please visit this page frequently as we will be updating it at least once a month. If you have any specific questions, do not hesitate to contact us directly!


Last Update June 29, 2021

 

The Facts

Cherries are currently developing in Mexico. Coffee growers are currently cleaning their plantations, monitoring, and doing plague and disease control, applying fertilizers, and some of them doing renovations. We expect for the first pickings to start in September for the farms in lower altitudes, in October for the middle-range farms and in November for the higher-altitude farms.

 

Our Take

If the climate continues as favorable as it goes, and it doesn’t affect the development of the cherries, we expect the quality and volumes to be as good as 2020-2021 harvest.

 

Next Steps

In June, we shipped over 1,200 bags to New York, London, Melbourne, and Houston. Our QC and production teams continue milling and doing quality assurance in full speed to continue shipping our Mexican coffee in July. In the meantime, PECA is visiting coffee growers, giving the respective feedback and recommendations as well as evaluating the next harvest.

 

 

The Facts

In Guatemala, the flowerings were concentrated in weeks 16 and 17 of this year. There was a second sporadic bloom between weeks 18 to 20. Consequently, in the central plateau, western and eastern departments of the country, cherry development looks promising due to the climatic conditions that favored this growth. Coffee growers are also carrying out tasks such as weed control, pest, and disease monitoring. In some farms, the first fertilization was completed during the first half of this month. To date, the pest and disease incidence have been in a much less decree, not requiring chemical control applications. Nationwide, however, in the farms below 1100 MSNM, there is a strong emphasis on the use of CBB (broca) traps to prevent pest propagation.

Our Take

We have seen firsthand how the producers are willing and motivated to establish fertilization plans. As a result, the PECA team is working hand in hand with the producers in this regard. Quality-wise, the distribution of grades and parchment coffee flow changed due to the volume and coffee deliveries by our current coffee growing partners and new alliances established. Producers additionally delivered more AAA and ML lots including limited lots of varieties such as Pacamara and Geishas. Also, women-led farms have increased, providing availability of limited volumes of this coffee. This effort goes hand in hand with our commitment since 2018 to source more coffee produced by women and new regions such as Quetzaltenango, El Progreso, Baja Verapaz.

Next Steps

During this harvest, Guatemala began the third-party verification with Enveritas to understand our impact and to lay the foundations for our continued social and economic impact initiatives in this origin. On the other hand, we are wrapping up coffee exports, especially to the United States and Asia. To date, 86% of the contracted coffee has been shipped out of Guatemala. Logistically, one of the biggest challenges this year was the availability of containers, which made the outbound process more complex, however, thanks to timely responses and proactive actions, we have managed to meet shipping times. Our Quality team is finishing quality assurance and milling. The PECA team is currently on the field monitoring the coffee harvest.

The Facts

To date, there is good fruit development taking place as 90% of the harvest is already curdled. In the Chalatenango area, the most abundant flowering occurred in week 17 and the Ahuachapán area in week 18. Now, coffee growers’ main activities are focused on finishing their first fertilization round, weed control, and pest and disease management, especially coffee rust prevention.  The PECA team is on the field visiting new producers, who require personalized technical assistance. We see a lot of potential and encouragement on improving quality and productivity.

Our Take

We have not seen major pest and disease problems in Chalatenango or Ahuachapán, however, constant farm monitoring is key to take preventive actions. Compared to the 2020 harvest, this year we see less CBB (Broca) incidence leading to higher quality, cleaner cup, and higher acceptance grade of sample offers. However, due to the temperature changes experienced at the beginning of the year, certain areas and farms had problems, as the cherries dry out when exposed to low temperatures. While this does not have a direct impact on cup quality, it impacts the physical quality of the coffee. Therefore, growers have invested more time in hand sorting or selective harvesting to minimize this effect. Also, the delivery trend shows a broad focus on honey and natural processes, leading to an exponential offer sample increase of both traditional and exotic varieties.  

Next Steps

Currently, in El Salvador, we have shipped 80% of the contracted coffee to Europe, Australia, Asia, and the United States. We expect to conclude exports at the beginning of July to the United States mainly. The logistics and quality team are working meticulously to complete this process successfully.  On the other hand, QC and PECA are conducting quality workshops and visiting farms, both to provide technical assistance and quality feedback.

The Facts

Transparency and consistency have been the cornerstone for our continued work and growth in Nicaragua. Currently, producers have finished with tissue management and have started farm infrastructure maintenance. The rainy period has not fully started in some areas causing some delays with the first fertilization round. Meanwhile, coffee growers continue with pest and disease management.  The harvest 2021-2022 in the Nueva Segovia area is estimated to start in December and in Jinotega and Matagalpa area in around mid-November.

 

Our Take

The quality of this 2020-2021 harvest has been outstanding and very consistent, leading to an increase of A, AA, and RTB grades from this origin. Additionally, productivity has been constant within our network of long-standing partners as well as new producers. We successfully fulfilled all forward and spot contracts now available in our import offices in USA, Europe, Australia, and Asia.                                                                                        

This year, Nicaragua also sourced and shipped honey and natural processes by working together with remarkable producers who are eager to innovate and have excellent processing protocols established. This also meant adapting our drying protocols and process at La Estrella and La Concordia dry mill to guarantee quality and manage volume.

 

Next Steps

Now, QC and PECA are visiting coffee producers in Nueva Segovia, Jinotega, and Matagalpa, monitoring the harvest, and providing farmers tailored feedback focused on the achievements accomplished and the areas of opportunities producers have. To date, 89% of all contracted coffee has been exported to Australia, the United States, London, and Belgium. The biggest challenge in exports has been the low influx of ships to Nicaragua, due to socio-political issues and COVID.                           
Our next shipment is to New York, and in the next month, we plan to complete 100% of our exports to destinations like the United States, Australia, and Japan. This year, despite the challenges, we have had a better container outbound process, which has allowed us to meet shipments and deliveries to destinations on schedule.

The Facts

In Tolima we are at 65% of the harvest while in the northwest of Huila the advance on harvest is at 45% and the south of Huila we are at 30% of progress.

 

Our Take

This year the harvest will come spread throughout the season, not peaking in any particular month, which is good because it will allow the coffee producers to achieve the adequate times, for the processes, and achieve good results, avoiding a bottleneck in production. The big challenge right now are the prices. Given the high market prices, a 75% – 90% of the coffee has been commercialized humid. This has made much more competitive the market for RTB and A coffees because the producers prefer to save time and work in the drying process for a more profitable price versus the production costs.

 

Next Steps

 We are on the process of unraveling the shipments of May and June due to the recent national strike. We’re not yet at the speed we would like to be, but we estimate that by August our shipment projections will be met. Our main challenge is the high price of coffee, which is making coffee producers worry less about producing high quality coffee and making it hard to gather it for us. PECA has been doing an immense job in communicating and educating producers, showing them the importance of this is a long-term business. We are keen to strengthen the commercial relationship with the producers we work with.

The Facts

In the Northern region, the harvest is at 35%. Some producers have already started delivering samples of their first pickings and lots and other fermentation experiments. In the South, the harvest in Zamora has reached a 52%, while in Loja it is just starting; currently at a 13%.

Our Take

We are very pleased in terms of quality. Most producers have maintained or improved their quality, and we haven’t seen as much defect issues (phenol, mold) as in previous years. On the other hand, there are regions -like Pichincha, in the North- where climate conditions haven’t been very helpful for harvest and drying. The rainy season should’ve come to an end in the area, but it is still going on.

 

Next Steps

 We have been working on creating more sales opportunities, developing new brands and profiles, and starting to develop some limited editions. We are working on calibrations with the quality team. Also, we will be renewing our dry mill equipment soon to be more efficient during production. Our next shipment will take place in August, we’ll ship a full container of SPOT offerings to North America, mainly from the South region of Ecuador. At the end of the month, we’ll receive the visit of the C.A.F.E. Practices auditing team for the certification of a group of 58 producers.

The Facts

Right the now the harvest it’s divided: 15.3% of progress in the North and 13.74% in the South; starting the first cherry pickings. We are registering intense rain in the North, more than usual, which has had a negative impact on quality. In the South of the country, we have noticed some impact of coffee leave rust and Ojo de Gallo in places with higher humidity; there’s a rise in rain compared to 2020

Our Take

Despite weather conditions, quality seems promising. Yields are still below 72%  (screen 15), which is normal considering the timing. First couple of higher grades (AA’s) have been purchased at our Jaen station, this shows the effort and extra care producers, members of the PECA Program, put on their coffees. PECA is finishing our organic chain audit and we are expecting to start buying organic coffees next week, right after this, our agronomists will focus on providing support to face the drying difficulties due to the incessant rains in both regions.

Next Steps

First sets of samples have been sent to all sales offices to move forward with contracts. Shipments will start on the second half of August along with some SPOT for our sales offices. Quality/PECA teams will continue to provide feedback to producers so they can adjust their post-harvest processes and avoid phenolic/moldy cups as the rainy season could be longer than expected. During this month we have been providing brand new bags to producers so they can use white/clean bags to store their parchment before delivery. PP bags are reusable, and the producers will receive the same number of bags they delivered with coffee so they can use them for the next batch.

Calendar

Mexico

El Salvador
Colombia

Galapagos

Guatemala

Nicaragua

Ecuador

Peru

Mexico

El Salvador
Colombia

Galapagos

Guatemala

Nicaragua

Ecuador

Peru

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