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With this harvest dashboard, we aim to keep you informed about the status of the harvest in each of the seven origins where Caravela operates, providing you with valuable information that will help you stay up to date of what’s happening on-the-ground.

Please visit this page frequently as we will be updating it at least once a month. If you have any specific questions, do not hesitate to contact us directly!


Last Update November 09, 2021

 


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

In the areas bellow 1.000 m.a.s.l the harvest has begun and in the areas at 1.100 m.a.s.l there are already some cherries ready to be picked. In general, the harvest is at a 10% looking healthy with coffee trees free of plagues. In the areas above 1.000 m.a.s.l we have been watching a low incidence of coffee leaf rust and borer beetle. Currently, producers are preparing their fermentation tanks and wet mill equipment for the upcoming harvest.The quality of the upcoming harvest is looking good, with good sized cherries, free of diseases with an even ripeness that will help with picking. We are expecting for the cherry pickers that normally come from Guatemala to not have any issues crossing the border into Mexico due to COVID-19. On the other hand, we are expecting prizes to stabilize so that speculation doesn’t affect our coffee purchase.The shipments are programmed to start between the end of February and beginning of March. Our PECA and quality teams continue gathering the information for the harvest estimate and the information and assistance for the organic certification of our supply chain in the different areas. Likewise, they are currently carrying on workshops with farmers for good practices regarding post-harvest while also visiting associations and organizations for purchase commitments. We are also opening new purchasing areas such as Guerrero and strengthening relationships in areas such as Puebla.

 

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The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

The harvest is progressing in Huehuetenango, Chiquimula, Zacapa, San Marcos, among other departments at a good pace. The coffee trees will be in the final stage of formation to begin maturation, so we expect the first harvests to commence in mid-December in the lowlands. Roya (coffee leaf rust) and Ojo de Gallo (Mycena citricolor) remain below 2% at a general level, not affecting the plants' health. However, the Chiquimula area shows the highest incidence of Coffee Borer Beetle (4%). Producers will be making cleanup pickings to reduce the Coffee Borer incidence in parchment coffee.100% of the farms executed the fertilization plan based on the technical assistance of PECA this harvest. The PECA team has finalized the harvest estimates. In the preliminary results, we see an increase in the volume of RTB, A and AA grades available for the next harvest. New producers (19) have joined our chain and the PECA program. We expect to receive the first lots in mid-December in the Chiquimula, Huehuetenango, and San Marcos areas. Additionally, some producers are evaluating whether to sell their coffee in cherry rather than parchment - this would affect the availability of specialty coffees in the local market. Our model allows us to guarantee prices above the market and recognize quality.We continue to make progress in measuring our farm-by-farm carbon footprint and production costs. The good news is that the first samples of coffee (type and offer) will soon be available at the import offices immediately after the opening of the purchasing warehouses. For the next harvest and to be closer to the producers in remote areas, we will be reactivating the Mobile Laboratories project in in Guatemala. Now is a good time to talk about Guatemala and future coffees available.


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

The harvest will begin in mid-December in the areas where we are present. El Salvador, according to our follow-up, shows an incidence of coffee leaf rust of 5%. In the Ahuachapán area, an incidence of 1% of the Ojo de Gallo has been observed. Producers who start harvesting later are currently applying rust control products. As for Coffee Borer Beetle, the incidence to date does not exceed 2% in farms. The first collections will be cleanings before the main harvest. It is important to mention that the PECA team emphasizes applications not less than 60 days before harvest to avoid traces of agrochemicals in the final product (coffee cup).The harvest is progressing very well, and we will be buying the first lots of coffee in mid-December, which will allow us to have coffee available for export between the end of February and March 2022 of grades RTB and A, and as the harvest progresses, lots grade AA, AAA, and ML. Chalatenango has had moderately rainy weather in the last week and Ahuachapán as well. For the next harvest, we will be receiving coffee from new areas such as Sonsonate, La Libertad, Santa Ana, and San Fernando in Chalatenango, providing a greater range of profiles and quality from this origin.The PECA team will be hosting training and workshop at the purchasing stations with our farmers' partners, covering topics such as best practices for harvesting, drying, and machinery maintenance before harvest begins. These topics are crucial to ensure future quality. We continue to measure the carbon footprint of all associated farms, and we expect to have preliminary data next month. This data will be the basis for our goals to be more sustainable and greener as we work hand-in-hand with farms.


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

The PECA team has identified a coffee leaf rust incidence of 3% to 5% in average at the farms, and on the other hand, coffee borer beetle incidence is below 2%. To be able to maintain these levels under control, the producers have been advised to elaborate traps to capture de coffee borer beetle and use of fungicides for the coffee leaf rust. These two tactics have had good results in the last months. The producers are right now finishing the last round of fertilization, and other activities for the beginning of harvest such as: purchase of bags and cherry-picking baskets, and repair and maintenance of general infrastructure.Due to the producers following the fertilization plans given by PECA, we are expecting a harvest quality like last years, in which we had a minimum rate of rejections of 2% and an increment of cup quality in some farms. Right now, the coffee cherry is in phase 4 of development, which gives us 45 to 60 days for the optimal ripeness of the cherry. Regarding volume, we are seeing the effects of biennial harvest and the 2020 hurricanes, ETA and IOTA. In the Nueva Segovia area, we are expecting a decrease in volume of around 30% and in Jinotega of around 20%, nevertheless we are mitigating the lower volumes with newer farmers.
The PECA team has finished the harvest estimate in 106 farms and 76 carbon footprint evaluations. At this time, the team has been focused in signing new purchasing contracts with coffee producers, searching for new potential farms, collecting samples for profile evaluations and follow up of farm management in view of 2023 harvest. At the stations of La Estrella and Concordia we are working on repairing and renewing drying beds, as well as general maintenance of infrastructure. We have been also having workshops for our quality, operations and PECA teams in regard to processes, procedures and new tendencies to guarantee standardization with the other origins and with new challenges.


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

The main harvest has started in the South of Huila while in the North of Huila, Tolima and Cauca the second semester crop has started. We will be receiving the bulk of the harvest at our purchasing stations in the between the middle and end November. The weather has been favorable and quality consistent.We are seeing a high number of wet coffees being commercialized, although, for the volumes we require it has presented an issue. Right now, the competition is strong with the prices being high without any physical or sensory analysis check. The good thing has been the loyalty, in all aspects, of the producers we work with and for this reason we haven’t had issues in delivering the coffee to our clients.We are still seeing issues with exporting due to the congestion in ports and lack of containers worldwide, which has made us do rollovers with higher frequency. At production we are working double shift to be able to roll out coffee 3 weeks prior to the contract so that we can make the coffee arrive to the client on the date they require. The costs have gone up considerably, but right now it is more important to fulfil the contracts with our clients than focus on costs.


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

The harvest in the North and Loja Region, in the south, has ended while at Zamora, in the south, harvest is still going on due to the warm and humid weather with constant precipitations. This weather condition is making the coffee trees constantly bloom and thus making the harvest extend. This year, in Galápagos, the harvest started earlier initiating in August and will end in December.The quality has been improving, passing from RTB to A and in some cases to AA. The technical advice of our PECA team has resulted in applied coffee farmers that strive towards quality. Regarding production volumes, this year it went down due to biennial effect, with the areas most affected being in the South. For the next year, 2022, we are expecting a good production as we are seeing healthy plants, a good indicator of a good harvest. Because of lack of contracts, we haven’t been able to purchase all the coffee for producers but we have been talking with them on purchasing more this upcoming year.We are having some issues with October shipments due to the lack of containers which has delayed some shipments. On the other hand, we upgraded are dry mill machine which has benefitted our operation in allowing us to be more efficient. We are currently processing lots for Spot coffee that will be exported soon.


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

Harvest is over, producers are delivering the last lots of 2021 and getting ready for next year. Weather has been helpful for the trees and producers are preparing to start implementing the sanitary controls to minimize risks.Despite being a difficult year for the entire supply chain, we have seen an overall improvement in quality, more producers delivering AA and higher grades consistently. Higher labor and farm input costs have been observed, but compensated through our pricing scheme, guaranteeing profits to producers and associations/Coops that are aligned with our shared long-term vision.Our entire team is focused on exports and quality assurance. Multiple containers have already landed at their destinations, with many more afloat. The goal is to avoid any controllable delays and our logistics team is constantly pursuing the optimal transit times.

With this harvest dashboard, we aim to keep you informed about the status of the harvest in each of the seven origins where Caravela operates, providing you with valuable information that will help you stay up to date of what’s happening on-the-ground.

Please visit this page frequently as we will be updating it at least once a month. If you have any specific questions, do not hesitate to contact us directly!


Last Update November 09, 2021

 

The Facts

In the areas bellow 1.000 m.a.s.l the harvest has begun and in the areas at 1.100 m.a.s.l  there are already some cherries ready to be picked. In general, the harvest is at a 10% looking healthy with coffee trees free of plagues. In the areas above 1.000 m.a.s.l we have been watching a low incidence of coffee leaf rust and borer beetle. Currently, producers are preparing their fermentation tanks and wet mill equipment for the upcoming harvest.

 

Our Take

The quality of the upcoming harvest is looking good, with good sized cherries, free of diseases with an even ripeness that will help with picking. We are expecting for the cherry pickers that normally come from Guatemala to not have any issues crossing the border into Mexico due to COVID-19. On the other hand, we are expecting prizes to stabilize so that speculation doesn’t affect our coffee purchase.

 

Next Steps

The shipments are programmed to start between the end of February and beginning of March. Our PECA and quality teams continue gathering the information for the harvest estimate and the information and assistance for the organic certification of our supply chain in the different areas. Likewise, they are currently carrying on workshops with farmers for good practices regarding post-harvest while also visiting associations and organizations for purchase commitments. We are also opening new purchasing areas such as Guerrero and strengthening relationships in areas such as Puebla.

 

 

The Facts

The harvest is progressing in Huehuetenango, Chiquimula, Zacapa, San Marcos, among other departments at a good pace. The coffee trees will be in the final stage of formation to begin maturation, so we expect the first harvests to commence in mid-December in the lowlands. Roya (coffee leaf rust) and Ojo de Gallo (Mycena citricolor) remain below 2% at a general level, not affecting the plants’ health. However, the Chiquimula area shows the highest incidence of Coffee Borer Beetle (4%). Producers will be making cleanup pickings to reduce the Coffee Borer incidence in parchment coffee. 

Our Take

100% of the farms executed the fertilization plan based on the technical assistance of PECA this harvest. The PECA team has finalized the harvest estimates. In the preliminary results, we see an increase in the volume of RTB, A and AA grades available for the next harvest. New producers (19) have joined our chain and the PECA program. We expect to receive the first lots in mid-December in the Chiquimula, Huehuetenango, and San Marcos areas. Additionally, some producers are evaluating whether to sell their coffee in cherry rather than parchment – this would affect the availability of specialty coffees in the local market. Our model allows us to guarantee prices above the market and recognize quality. 

Next Steps

We continue to make progress in measuring our farm-by-farm carbon footprint and production costs. The good news is that the first samples of coffee (type and offer) will soon be available at the import offices immediately after the opening of the purchasing warehouses. For the next harvest and to be closer to the producers in remote areas, we will be reactivating the Mobile Laboratories project in in Guatemala. Now is a good time to talk about Guatemala and future coffees available. 

The Facts

The harvest will begin in mid-December in the areas where we are present. El Salvador, according to our follow-up, shows an incidence of coffee leaf rust of 5%. In the Ahuachapán area, an incidence of 1% of the Ojo de Gallo has been observed. Producers who start harvesting later are currently applying rust control products. As for Coffee Borer Beetle, the incidence to date does not exceed 2% in farms. The first collections will be cleanings before the main harvest. It is important to mention that the PECA team emphasizes applications not less than 60 days before harvest to avoid traces of agrochemicals in the final product (coffee cup). 

Our Take

The harvest is progressing very well, and we will be buying the first lots of coffee in mid-December, which will allow us to have coffee available for export between the end of February and March 2022 of grades RTB and A, and as the harvest progresses, lots grade AA, AAA, and ML. Chalatenango has had moderately rainy weather in the last week and Ahuachapán as well. For the next harvest, we will be receiving coffee from new areas such as Sonsonate, La Libertad, Santa Ana, and San Fernando in Chalatenango, providing a greater range of profiles and quality from this origin. 

Next Steps

The PECA team will be hosting training and workshop at the purchasing stations with our farmers’ partners, covering topics such as best practices for harvesting, drying, and machinery maintenance before harvest begins. These topics are crucial to ensure future quality. We continue to measure the carbon footprint of all associated farms, and we expect to have preliminary data next month. This data will be the basis for our goals to be more sustainable and greener as we work hand-in-hand with farms. 

The Facts

The PECA team has identified a coffee leaf rust incidence of 3% to 5% in average at the farms, and on the other hand, coffee borer beetle incidence is below 2%. To be able to maintain these levels under control, the producers have been advised to elaborate traps to capture de coffee borer beetle and use of fungicides for the coffee leaf rust. These two tactics have had good results in the last months. The producers are right now finishing the last round of fertilization, and other activities for the beginning of harvest such as: purchase of bags and cherry-picking baskets, and repair and maintenance of general infrastructure.

 

Our Take

Due to the producers following the fertilization plans given by PECA, we are expecting a harvest quality like last years, in which we had a minimum rate of rejections of 2% and an increment of cup quality in some farms. Right now, the coffee cherry is in phase 4 of development, which gives us 45 to 60 days for the optimal ripeness of the cherry. Regarding volume, we are seeing the effects of biennial harvest and the 2020 hurricanes, ETA and IOTA. In the Nueva Segovia area, we are expecting a decrease in volume of around 30% and in Jinotega of around 20%, nevertheless we are mitigating the lower volumes with newer farmers.

 

Next Steps

The PECA team has finished the harvest estimate in 106 farms and 76 carbon footprint evaluations. At this time, the team has been focused in signing new purchasing contracts with coffee producers, searching for new potential farms, collecting samples for profile evaluations and follow up of farm management in view of 2023 harvest. At the stations of La Estrella and Concordia we are working on repairing and renewing drying beds, as well as general maintenance of infrastructure. We have been also having workshops for our quality, operations and PECA teams in regard to processes, procedures and new tendencies to guarantee standardization with the other origins and with new challenges.

The Facts

The main harvest has started in the South of Huila while in the North of Huila, Tolima and Cauca the second semester crop has started. We will be receiving the bulk of the harvest at our purchasing stations in the between the middle and end November. The weather has been favorable and quality consistent.

Our Take

We are seeing a high number of wet coffees being commercialized, although, for the volumes we require it has presented an issue. Right now, the competition is strong with the prices being high without any physical or sensory analysis check. The good thing has been the loyalty, in all aspects, of the producers we work with and for this reason we haven’t had issues in delivering the coffee to our clients.

 Next Steps

We are still seeing issues with exporting due to the congestion in ports and lack of containers worldwide, which has made us do rollovers with higher frequency. At production we are working double shift to be able to roll out coffee 3 weeks prior to the contract so that we can make the coffee arrive to the client on the date they require. The costs have gone up considerably, but right now it is more important to fulfil the contracts with our clients than focus on costs.

The Facts

The harvest in the North and Loja Region, in the south, has ended while at Zamora, in the south, harvest is still going on due to the warm and humid weather with constant precipitations. This weather condition is making the coffee trees constantly bloom and thus making the harvest extend. This year, in Galápagos, the harvest started earlier initiating in August and will end in December.

Our Take

The quality has been improving, passing from RTB to A and in some cases to AA. The technical advice of our PECA team has resulted in applied coffee farmers that strive towards quality. Regarding production volumes, this year it went down due to biennial effect, with the areas most affected being in the South. For the next year, 2022, we are expecting a good production as we are seeing healthy plants, a good indicator of a good harvest. Because of lack of contracts, we haven’t been able to purchase all the coffee for producers but we have been talking with them on purchasing more this upcoming year.

Next Steps

We are having some issues with October shipments due to the lack of containers which has delayed some shipments. On the other hand, we upgraded are dry mill machine which has benefitted our operation in allowing us to be more efficient. We are currently processing lots for Spot coffee that will be exported soon. 

The Facts

Harvest is over, producers are delivering the last lots of 2021 and getting ready for next year. Weather has been helpful for the trees and producers are preparing to start implementing the sanitary controls to minimize risks.

Our Take

Despite being a difficult year for the entire supply chain, we have seen an overall improvement in quality, more producers delivering AA and higher grades consistently. Higher labor and farm input costs have been observed, but compensated through our pricing scheme, guaranteeing profits to producers and associations/Coops that are aligned with our shared long-term vision.

Next Steps

Our entire team is focused on exports and quality assurance. Multiple containers have already landed at their destinations, with many more afloat. The goal is to avoid any controllable delays and our logistics team is constantly pursuing the optimal transit times.

Calendar

Mexico

El Salvador
Colombia

Galapagos

Guatemala

Nicaragua

Ecuador

Peru

Mexico

El Salvador
Colombia

Galapagos

Guatemala

Nicaragua

Ecuador

Peru

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