Harvest Dashboard

Harvest Dashboard

With this harvest dashboard, we aim to keep you informed about the status of the harvest in each of the seven origins where Caravela operates, providing you with valuable information that will help you stay up to date of what’s happening on-the-ground. 

Please visit this page frequently as we will be updating it at least once a month. If you have any specific questions, do not hesitate to contact us directly!


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

The harvest in Mexico is almost finished, with the last picking being done at farms locate above 1,600 m.a.s.l. There is still some coffee in the hands of coffee growers, but those remaining kilos should arrive the last week of March to our purchasing warehouses in Oaxaca and Chiapas. We estimate buying an additional 100,000 kg of dry parchment by the end of March. The quality of the coffee purchased this year has been better than the year before. We are being much stricter and demanding with coffee growers than last year, and the best part is that growers are responding positively by following our recommendations. In general, the productivity has been lower, mainly because the production is organic and they are not using fertilizers, but the quality is great! We are happy to see associations and producers seeing Caravela as their first options to sell their coffee!

We have started dry milling and are planning to start shipping in April, starting with two containers leaving to the USA and continuing with three containers every month until June to the rest of our import offices. We are continuously sending samples to our import offices so that we get their approval to mill and ship ASAP. Our PECA team, meanwhile, continue working hand in hand with coffee growers for them to improve their processes, recommending them selective harvesting, floating coffee, longer fermentations, and slower drying techniques.


 


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

Harvest in Guatemala is wrapping up and will be finished within the next weeks. In Chiquimula, the harvest is over, while Huehuetenango reaches 75% for farms for farms located above 1600 m.a.s.l. During the first weeks of March heavy rain and low temperatures have affected pickings in the Eastern side, Huehuetenango being the most affected. Coffee trees at farms located below 1300 m.a.s.l. have seen the first flowers blooming as they prepare for next harvest. PECA is closely monitoring this trend to estimate the impact it could have on crop 2020-2021. The main challenge this harvest has been low yields from parchment to green, especially in Chiquimula where drought (water stress) affected cherry development phase. Despite this, we are still sourcing solid and tasty coffee from our producing partners and alliances.

As we navigate current times, the team is working on production and milling while taking all preventive measures against COVID-19. Thus far, shipments are moving as planned. However, there might be some delays down the road if the Government implements stricter restrictions and quarantine measures to protect the Guatemalan population. First coffees will be afloat next week heading to Europe and Australia.


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

Harvest is over in El Salvador and producers will finish their drying process during the first 1st week of April. We’re seeing coffee plantations being affected by coffee leaf rust especially those located bellow 1400 m.a.s.l and high incidence of anthracnosis which affects plant tissue at farms bellow 1200 m.a.s.l. PECA is currently focusing on providing remote assistance to producers and monitoring post-harvest activities to minimize the impact.We have observed an increase in volume and improvement in quality as we approach the end of the harvest. Some producers that have stored coffee at their farms and are now starting to deliver their remaining lots. Nonetheless, coffees from Chalatenango show a high incidence of coffee berry borer (broca) compared to last year. QC team and PECA are constantly providing feedback to producer for each sample delivered and producers are collecting payment on average two days after samples being approved.

In these current times, being present for producers is key to sustain the supply chain. PECA will be providing technical assistance through phone calls and constantly checking in with producers. The last two weeks of March have been key to plan milling and start shipping. During the first two weeks of April, our QC team will be focusing on quality assurance so that we can start our first shipments after Easter week. Nevertheless, we are getting ready for a potential disruption in the supply chain due to new coronavirus outbreak. We’ll keep working to fulfill contracted coffee and safeguard our staff at origin.


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

The harvest in Nueva Segovias has officially come to an end. In Jinotega, coffee growers have started post-harvest activities, carrying out maintenance work on the coffee plantations after the harvest. Some coffee growers have requested financing due to the lack of credit being provided by local banks. In Nueva Segovia, the situation was really dramatic as beside the decrease in volumes, high grades were very hard to find, seeing big variations in quality and volumes delivered against historical averages. With 90% of the coffee assessed, there was a significant increase in availability of lower quality grades and decreases in higher grades versus the previous years. In Jinotega, coffee harvesting exceeded the previous year's volumes by 2%, but the coffee was affected by quality. In Nueva Segovia it has been even more dramatic. As almost 99% of the coffee is now dry, we are focusing on QA, milling and shipping. By end of March we will have shipped almost 50% of the containers planned from 2020. The main risk we face at this moment is that shipping lines roll over shipments without prior notice, as a shortage of containers and the low priority of Puerto Corinto in their schedules make this very likely at certain times.


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

Coffee farmers have finished harvesting coffee from the 2nd Semester Harvest with farmers starting pre-harvesting activities. Most of the regions that have a 1st semester harvest report crop advance under 5% with harvesting to significantly increase by end of March across the south of the country. Farmers are taking advantage of the high market prices to sell wet parchment or cherry. Flowerings for second semester harvest have been very good. With internal prices increasing to historical records (in local currency), all qualities have become much more expensive. UGQ coffee is being traded close to 50 cents over NY ICE and for specialty coffee competition has been fierce while the crop reaches maturation. We've had some delays in January/March shipments as volumes bought in the first month of the year have been lower than expected, but our volumes purchased in February were the highest in the company's history. As the crop continues to advance, procurement will increase to recover some of the lost time. The lock-down order by the Government until April 13 will put a damp on our progress. The “good” news is that the harvest is just starting, so the effect might not be as big as in other countries, if and only if, the situation can be controlled in the next 20 days and we can slowly start again after Easter.


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

Harvest in Galapagos is over. In the mainland, we expect to see a small fly crop in the North in March/April, which will allow us to buy some lots for shipment in the first half of 2020. The main harvest is expected to start around May/June in the North and July in the South. There is currently no coffee available for purchase as all regions are waiting for the new harvest to start. Flowerings in the South have been very good, promising a good harvest. In the North however flowering have been less pronounced, and we are monitoring them to review our North region forecast. Crop forecast results to be reviewed in the next few weeks and small fly crop lots might be available in the March-May period. As most of the country is in lockdown, PECA has been focusing on virtual and remote assistance to farmers.


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

Crop progress is at 3% in Cajamarca (northern region) and 0,5% in Cusco (southern region). Precipitations are up +3% vs last year in both regions. We are expecting to open our warehouses to start receiving parchment by the end of May. Coffee borer incidence continues, 5-7% (1500-1750 m.a.s.l.) and leaf rust still represent an important threat. Ojo de Gallo presence at 1% in farms above 1800 m.a.s.l. The coffee borer and leaf rust represent a reduction from 3-5% in volume as per our estimations. We could expect a reduction from 10-15% vs LY harvest volumes due to the biannual cycle and the effect of low prices seen last year, which motivated farmers to abandon coffee. Before the COVID-19 situation, PECA was delivering Anti-Coffee Borer Packs (with Bauveria Baussania) at farms and including training in how to use them, and at the same time doing workshops to teach farmers how fight the Leaf Rust with Copper Sulfate to get ready for the incoming harvest. Currently PECA is working on renewing our organic certifications and providing support to farmers through calls and SMS considering the situation with the virus.

With this harvest dashboard, we aim to keep you informed about the status of the harvest in each of the seven origins where Caravela operates, providing you with valuable information that will help you stay up to date of what’s happening on-the-ground. 

Please visit this page frequently as we will be updating it at least once a month. If you have any specific questions, do not hesitate to contact us directly!

The Facts

The harvest in Mexico is almost finished, with the last picking being done at farms locate above 1,600 m.a.s.l. There is still some coffee in the hands of coffee growers, but those remaining kilos should arrive the last week of March to our purchasing warehouses in Oaxaca and Chiapas. We estimate buying an additional 100,000 kg of dry parchment by the end of March. 

Our Take

The quality of the coffee purchased this year has been better than the year before. We are being much stricter and demanding with coffee growers than last year, and the best part is that growers are responding positively by following our recommendations. In general, the productivity has been lower, mainly because the production is organic and they are not using fertilizers, but the quality is great! We are happy to see associations and producers seeing Caravela as their first options to sell their coffee! 

Next Steps

We have started dry milling and are planning to start shipping in April, starting with two containers leaving to the USA and continuing with three containers every month until June to the rest of our import offices. We are continuously sending samples to our import offices so that we get their approval to mill and ship ASAP.  Our PECA team, meanwhile, continue working hand in hand with coffee growers for them to improve their processes, recommending them selective harvesting, floating coffee, longer fermentations, and slower drying techniques. 

 

The Facts

Harvest in Guatemala is wrapping up and will be finished within the next weeks. In Chiquimula, the harvest is over, while Huehuetenango reaches 75% for farms for farms located above 1600 m.a.s.l. During the first weeks of March heavy rain and low temperatures have affected pickings in the Eastern side, Huehuetenango being the most affected. Coffee trees at farms located below 1300 m.a.s.l. have seen the first flowers blooming as they prepare for next harvest. PECA is closely monitoring this trend to estimate the impact it could have on crop 2020-2021.  

Our Take

The main challenge this harvest has been low yields from parchment to green, especially in Chiquimula where drought (water stress) affected cherry development phase. Despite this, we are still sourcing solid and tasty coffee from our producing partners and alliances.  

Next Steps

As we navigate current times, the team is working on production and milling while taking all preventive measures against COVID-19. Thus far, shipments are moving as planned. However, there might be some delays down the road if the Government implements stricter restrictions and quarantine measures to protect the Guatemalan population. First coffees will be afloat next week heading to Europe and Australia. 

The Facts

Harvest is over in El Salvador and producers will finish their drying process during the first 1st week of April. We’re seeing coffee plantations being affected by coffee leaf rust especially those located bellow 1400 m.a.s.l and high incidence of anthracnosis which affects plant tissue at farms bellow 1200 m.a.s.l. PECA is currently focusing on providing remote assistance to producers and monitoring post-harvest activities to minimize the impact.  

Our Take

We have observed an increase in volume and improvement in quality as we approach the end of the harvest. Some producers that have stored coffee at their farms and are now starting to deliver their remaining lots. Nonetheless, coffees from Chalatenango show a high incidence of coffee berry borer (brocacompared to last year. QC team and PECA are constantly providing feedback to producer for each sample delivered and producers are collecting payment on average two days after samples being approved.   

Next Steps

In these current times, being present for producers is key to sustain the supply chain. PECA will be providing technical assistance through phone calls and constantly checking in with producers. The last two weeks of March have been key to plan milling and start shipping.  During the first two weeks of April, our QC team will be focusing on quality assurance so that we can start our first shipments after Easter week. Nevertheless, we are getting ready for a potential disruption in the supply chain due to new coronavirus outbreak. We’ll keep working to fulfill contracted coffee and safeguard our staff at origin.  

The Facts

The harvest in Nueva Segovias has officially come to an end. In Jinotega, coffee growers have started post-harvest activities, carrying out maintenance work on the coffee plantations after the harvest. Some coffee growers have requested financing due to the lack of credit being provided by local banks. In Nueva Segovia, the situation was really dramatic as beside the decrease in volumes, high grades were very hard to find, seeing big variations in quality and volumes delivered against historical averages. 

Our Take

With 90% of the coffee assessed, there was a significant increase in availability of lower quality grades and decreases in higher grades versus the previous years. In Jinotega, coffee harvesting exceeded the previous year’s volumes by 2%, but the coffee was affected by quality. In Nueva Segovia it has been even more dramatic. 

Next Steps

As almost 99% of the coffee is now dry, we are focusing on QA, milling and shipping. By end of March we will have shipped almost 50% of the containers planned from 2020. The main risk we face at this moment is that shipping lines roll over shipments without prior notice, as a shortage of containers and the low priority of Puerto Corinto in their schedules make this very likely at certain times. 

The Facts

Coffee farmers have finished harvesting coffee from the 2nd Semester Harvest with farmers starting preharvesting activities. Most of the regions that have a 1st semester harvest report crop advance under 5% with harvesting to significantly increase by end of March across the south of the country. Farmers are taking advantage of the high market prices to sell wet parchment or cherry. Flowerings for second semester harvest have been very good. 

Our Take

With internal prices increasing to historical records (in local currency), all qualities have become much more expensive. UGQ coffee is being traded close to 50 cents over NY ICE and for specialty coffee competition has been fierce while the crop reaches maturation. 

Next Steps

We’ve had some delays in January/March shipments as volumes bought in the first month of the year have been lower than expected, but our volumes purchased in February were the highest in the company’s history. As the crop continues to advance, procurement will increase to recover some of the lost time. The lock-down order by the Government until April 13 will put a damp on our progress.  The “good” news is that the harvest is just starting, so the effect might not be as big as in other countries, if and only if, the situation can be controlled in the next 20 days and we can slowly start again after Easter.  

The Facts

Harvest in Galapagos is over. In the mainland, we expect to see a small fly crop in the North in March/April, which will allow us to buy some lots for shipment in the first half of 2020.  The main harvest is expected to start around May/June in the North and July in the South. 

Our Take

There is currently no coffee available for purchase as all regions are waiting for the new harvest to start. Flowerings in the South have been very good, promising a good harvest. In the North however flowering have been less pronounced, and we are monitoring them to review our North region forecast. 

Next Steps

Crop forecast results to be reviewed in the next few weeks and small fly crop lots might be available in the March-May period. As most of the country is in lockdown, PECA has been focusing on virtual and remote assistance to farmers. 

The Facts

Crop progress is at 3% in Cajamarca (northern region) and 0,5% in Cusco (southern region). Precipitations are up +3% vs last year in both regions. We are expecting to open our warehouses to start receiving parchment by the end of May. Coffee borer incidence continues, 5-7% (1500-1750 m.a.s.l.) and leaf rust still represent an important threat. Ojo de Gallo presence at 1% in farms above 1800 m.a.s.l 

Our Take

The coffee borer and leaf rust represent a reduction from 3-5% in volume as per our estimations. We could expect a reduction from 10-15% vs LY harvest volumes due to the biannual cycle and the effect of low prices seen last year, which motivated farmers to abandon coffee. 

Next Steps

Before the COVID-19 situation, PECA was delivering Anti-Coffee Borer Packs (with Bauveria Baussaniaat farms and including training in how to use them, and at the same time doing workshops to teach farmers how fight the Leaf Rust with Copper Sulfate to get ready for the incoming harvest. Currently PECA is working on renewing our organic certifications and providing support to farmers through calls and SMS considering the situation with the virus. 

Calendar

Mexico
El Salvador
Colombia

Galapagos

Guatemala
Nicaragua

Ecuador

Peru

Mexico
El Salvador
Colombia

Galapagos

Guatemala
Nicaragua

Ecuador

Peru

Share

Pin It on Pinterest