Harvest Dashboard

Harvest Dashboard

With this harvest dashboard, we aim to keep you informed about the status of the harvest in each of the seven origins where Caravela operates, providing you with valuable information that will help you stay up to date of what’s happening on-the-ground. 

Please visit this page frequently as we will be updating it at least once a month. If you have any specific questions, do not hesitate to contact us directly!


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

Flowerings in both Chiapas and Oaxaca have now started, and our PECA team is keeping track of the blooming dates to analyze and plan accordingly for the 2020-2021 harvest. According to the flowering calendar, we can predict that the harvest will start earlier than usual, commencing in October at the lower farms and in November in the regions where Caravela sources coffee. We are anxiously awaiting the arrival of the rainy season! In general, the quality of the coffee this year was much better, coffees were more consistent, structured, balanced, and creamy. We saw a huge improvement in both the physical and sensorial quality of the coffees. However, due to the COVID-19 we were forced to buy less coffee than expected. We have started milling coffee and will do our best to move as fast as possible. Our first container will hit the water end of April. At this point in time we expect to finish exporting coffee in the first half of June. Ports remain open and functioning, albeit slower than normal as many people are working from home.

 


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

Nature is showing its generosity as flowerings have started in Guatemala. PECA is monitoring and analyzing blooming patterns. Flowerings in San Marcos started the first week of April while in Huehuetenango in mid-April, but it is expected that within the next week there will be another bloom due to the rainy days observed lately.

Meanwhile, the main flowering in Chiquimula are expected to happen during the last week of April and first of May. Flowering uniformity is important as it gives us information about the harvesting and ripening patterns for the next harvest.
The coffee plantations have experienced high temperatures and water stress due to the summer season and heat waves in the country. Therefore, post-harvest activities, including pest and disease control, are currently a top priority. Failure to control the coffee berry borer at this time can lead to an uncontrolled outbreak that affects the yield of the next harvest.

PECA is working diligently with producers and developing a modified training plan with methodologies for personalized assistance and data collection for 2019-2020 harvest report.
The team has seamlessly transitioned to a new working model and safety measures that are being implemented. 50% of the staff (PECA and administrative staff) are currently working from home, and only essential teams such as the quality, milling, and logistics teams are working on site while following all recommendations.

Additionally, the national curfew from 6 a.m. to 4 p.m. has been extended with weekly reviews in place by the government depending on the curve. As of the last week of April, 65% of the contracted coffee has already been shipped. We hope to complete our shipments before end of May.


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

As of now, 70% of the farms located below 1,500 MASL have seen trees bloom, which will result in a more homogeneous ripening rate for the next harvest. By contrast, farms at higher altitudes have experienced less rainy days leading only to a 25% flowering prevalence – which will result in coffee ripening delays during the harvest season. Farmers at these altitudes expect the main flowerings to occur in May.

The PECA team continues to work hard with the producers, conducting crop surveys and closing the harvest data collection for the 2019-2020 harvest.
PECA's main objective now is to strategically advise producers based on each farm’s concerns. April and May are months for shade management; however, producers are waiting for the optimal time to carry out this activity as they are still seeing warmer days.

In addition, 60% of farmers have placed traditional traps inside the plantations to avoid coffee berry borer, which affected this year's coffee yield. For farmers, this time is crucial to plan, and they are doing their best to implement prevention measures.
We keep growing with coffee producers despite the distance! PECA provides training and personalized assistance to the producer through phone calls, videos and digital material focused on post-harvest practices. 70% of staff works from home while quality control, milling and logistics teams continue to work on site. 30% of the coffee has been prepared to be shipped during the first week of May.

Government organizations, customs agencies, ports are still working, although under a limited schedule that slows down the process. We plan to wrap up shipping in the first weeks of June if there are no major roadblocks.


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

Coffee growers have completed their sanitary cleaning process, removing all the last beans left in the coffee trees, such as dry and green beans, that can bring berry borer if not picked. Producers are currently focusing on flowering monitoring, and according to conversations with coffee grower in Jinotega there is a 60% flowering advance and in Nueva Segovia 45%. Quality and volume compliance have been a challenge. We didn’t receive enough AA and AAA grade coffee, which experienced deficits of more than 80%.
The default rate exceeded 40% of the global volume established in the delivery commitments, which means that more than 80% of the producers failed to comply with committed volumes due to problems related to physical and sensorial defects. Quality rejections represented 16% of the total volumes received.

Because of low volumes and quality, many producers have been unable to fulfill the economic commitments they have with banks.
The Nicaraguan government have recognized only 12 coronavirus confirmed cases, this continues to delay paperwork and document processing activities in government agencies. Having shipped 8 containers in the first 3 weeks of April, one additional container will be shipped this month to the USA.

The main risk continues to be the re-scheduling that shipping companies usually do without prior notice, due to Nicaragua's low export weight, which makes Puerto Corinto not a top priority. We expect to finish shipping in May.


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

Coffee farmers have started harvesting coffee from the 2nd Semester Harvest with an increase of deliveries to our warehouse's week after week. The harvest is starting for the southern region and we are currently below 15% of harvest. Given the current lock down restrictions farmers are focusing on their better lots to complete the dry parchment process while lower qualities are being sold in cherry and wet parchment to local intermediaries. With internal prices remaining high, farmers are taking advantage of their first pickings and selling part of it wet and cherry. That will help them streamline their cash flow as it frees resources to focus on the batches that have higher quality potential.

As a few roasters have requested shipment delays given the COVID pandemic, we have been focusing on negotiating with farmers groups so that everyone wins in the long run.
The delayed shipments of the Feb/March contracts are slowly being exported as parts of the supply chain are slowly improving.

We continue facing logistical challenges as every town has its own restrictions on movement of people and goods causing delays and surcharges through the entire logistical supply chain. As the crop continues to advance, procurement continues to increase, and our PECA team continues monitoring availability of pickers and labors in the different regions.


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

Galapagos’ first flowering occurred during the second half of April with farmers being optimistic for the end of year harvest. Northern continental Ecuador farmers under 1,400 masl report first pickings with peak of the harvest by early June. Southern Farmers expect first pickings in around 3-4 weeks. The country remains on a very tight lockdown with almost all activities in a stand still. By the next 2 weeks some restrictions will start to be eased which shall help farmers get more active in workshops and in pickings. Given the size of the farms, the harvesting can be mostly done by farmers themselves and their families. Despite the slow-down of business with the lockdown Ecuador continues to be attractive as an exotic origin for many of our customers.

Some roasters have expressed interest for shipments in the 4Q, just in time for the new harvest to start being exported.


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

Harvest progress is at 7% in Cajamarca and 1% in Cusco. Precipitations are up +2% vs last year. Rains and cloudy weather are extending drying time for the commercial grade coffees. Quarantine is expected to end the 11th of May, we are planning to start operations by the end of May/early June once the government lifts the restrictions. The coffee borer and leaf rust still represent a threat to producers in terms of quality and yields. Due to the Covid-19 restrictions, lack of labor will impact most of the large and medium sized farms as their dependence for harvesting and weeding is not covered by family members or Mingas. PECA continues to provide support and guidance to producers through calls/SMS and simultaneously working on paperwork related to our organic certifications in Cajamarca and Cusco. Producers are worried about the lack of labor, but the impact will be less hard on them due to the farm sizes.

With this harvest dashboard, we aim to keep you informed about the status of the harvest in each of the seven origins where Caravela operates, providing you with valuable information that will help you stay up to date of what’s happening on-the-ground. 

Please visit this page frequently as we will be updating it at least once a month. If you have any specific questions, do not hesitate to contact us directly!

The Facts

Flowerings in both Chiapas and Oaxaca have now started, and our PECA team is keeping track of the blooming dates to analyze and plan accordingly for the 2020-2021 harvest. According to the flowering calendar, we can predict that the harvest will start earlier than usual, commencing in October at the lower farms and in November in the regions where Caravela sources coffee.  We are anxiously awaiting the arrival of the rainy season! 

Our Take

In general, the quality of the coffee this year was much better, coffees were more consistent, structured, balanced, and creamy. We saw a huge improvement in both the physical and sensorial quality of the coffees. However, due to the COVID-19 we were forced to buy less coffee than expected.  

Next Steps

We have started milling coffee and will do our best to move as fast as possible. Our first container will hit the water end of April. At this point in time we expect to finish exporting coffee in the first half of June. Ports remain open and functioning, albeit slower than normal as many people are working from home. 

 

The Facts

Nature is showing its generosity as flowerings have started in Guatemala. PECA is monitoring and analyzing blooming patterns. Flowerings in San Marcos started the first week of April while in Huehuetenango in mid-April, but it is expected that within the next week there will be another bloom due to the rainy days observed lately 

 Meanwhile, the main flowering iChiquimula are expected to happen during the last week of April and first of May. Flowering uniformity is important as it gives us information about the harvesting and ripening patterns for the next harvest.  

Our Take

The coffee plantations have experienced high temperatures and water stress due to the summer season and heat waves in the country. Therefore, post-harvest activities, including pest and disease control, are currently a top priority. Failure to control the coffee berry borer at this time can lead to an uncontrolled outbreak that affects the yield of the next harvest. 

PECA is working diligently with producers and developing a modified training plan with methodologies for personalized assistance and data collection for 2019-2020 harvest report.  

Next Steps

The team has seamlessly transitioned to a new working model and safety measures that are being implemented. 50% of the staff (PECA and administrative staff) are currently working from home, and only essential teams such as the quality, milling, and logistics teams are working on site while following all recommendations.  

Additionally, the national curfew from 6 a.m. to 4 p.m. has been extended with weekly reviews in place by the government depending on the curve. As of the last week of April, 65% of the contracted coffee has already been shipped. We hope to complete our shipments before end of May. 

 

The Facts

As of now, 70% of the farms located below 1,500 MASL have seen trees bloom, which will result in a more homogeneous ripening rate for the next harvest. By contrast, farms at higher altitudes have experienced less rainy days leading only to a 25% flowering prevalence – which will result in coffee ripening delays during the harvest season. Farmers at these altitudes expect the main flowerings to occur in May. 

The PECA team continues to work hard with the producers, conducting crop surveys and closing the harvest data collection for the 2019-2020 harvest 

Our Take

PECA’s main objective now is to strategically advise producers based on each farm’s concerns. April and May are months for shade management; however, producers are waiting for the optimal time to carry out this activity as they are still seeing warmer days.  

In addition, 60% of farmers have placed traditional traps inside the plantations to avoid coffee berry borer, which affected this year’s coffee yield.  For farmers, this time is crucial to plan, and they are doing their best to implement prevention measures. 

Next Steps

We keep growing with coffee producers despite the distance! PECA provides training and personalized assistance to the producer through phone calls, videos and digital material focused on post-harvest practices. 70% of staff works from home while quality control, milling and logistics teams continue to work on site. 30% of the coffee has been prepared to be shipped during the first week of May 

Government organizations, customs agencies, ports are still working, although under a limited schedule that slows down the process. We plan to wrap up shipping in the first weeks of June if there are no major roadblocks.  

The Facts

Coffee growers have completed their sanitary cleaning processremoving all the last beans left in the coffee treessuch as dry and green beans, that can bring berry borer if not pickedProducers are currently focusing on flowering monitoring, and according to conversations with coffee grower in Jinotega there is a 60% flowering advance and in Nueva Segovia 45%.

Our Take

Quality and volume compliance have been a challenge. We didn’t receive enough AA and AAA grade coffee, which experienced deficits of more than 80%. 
The default rate exceeded 40% of the global volume established in the delivery commitments, which means that more than 80% of the producers failed to comply with committed volumes due to problems related to physical and sensorial defectsQuality rejections represented 16% of the total volumes received. 
 
Because of low volumes and quality, many producers have been unable to fulfill the economic commitments they have with banks.

 

Next Steps

The Nicaraguan government have recognized only 12 coronavirus confirmed cases, this continues to delay paperwork and document processing activities in government agencies. Having shipped 8 containers in the first 3 weeks of April, one additional container will be shipped this month to the USA. 

The main risk continues to be the rescheduling that shipping companies usually do without prior notice, due to Nicaragua’s low export weight, which makes Puerto Corinto not a top priority. We expect to finish shipping in May. 

The Facts

Coffee farmers have started harvesting coffee from the 2nd Semester Harvest with an increase of deliveries to our warehouse’s week after week. The harvest is starting for the southern region and we are currently below 15% of harvest. Given the current lock down restrictions farmers are focusing on their better lots to complete the dry parchment process while lower qualities are being sold in cherry and wet parchment to local intermediaries.  

Our Take

With internal prices remaining high, farmers are taking advantage of their first pickings and selling part of it wet and cherry. That will help them streamline their cash flow as it frees resources to focus on the batches that have higher quality potential.

As a few roasters have requested shipment delays given the COVID pandemic, we have been focusing on negotiating with farmers groups so that everyone wins in the long run. 

Next Steps

The delayed shipments of the Feb/March contracts are slowly being exported as parts of the supply chain are slowly improving.

We continue facing logistical challenges as every town has its own restrictions on movement of people and goods causing delays and surcharges through the entire logistical supply chain.   As the crop continues to advance, procurement continues to increase, and our PECA team continues monitoring availability of pickers and labors in the different regions. 

The Facts

Galapagos first flowering occurred during the second half of April with farmers being optimistic for the end of year harvest. Northern continental Ecuador farmers under 1,400 masl report first pickings with peak of the harvest by early June. Southern Farmers expect first pickings in around 3-4 weeks. 

Our Take

The country remains on a very tight lockdown with almost all activities in a stand still. By the next 2 weeks some restrictions will start to be eased which shall help farmers get more active in workshops and in pickings. Given the size of the farms, the harvesting can be mostly done by farmers themselves and their families. 

Next Steps

Despite the slow-down of business with the lockdown Ecuador continues to be attractive as an exotic origin for many of our customers.  

Some roasters have expressed interest for shipments in the 4Q, just in time for the new harvest to start being exported. 

The Facts

Harvest progress is at 7% in Cajamarca and 1% in Cusco. Precipitations are up +2% vs last year. Rains and cloudy weather are extending drying time for the commercial grade coffees. Quarantine is expected to end the 11th of May, we are planning to start operations by the end of May/early June once the government lifts the restrictions. 

Our Take

The coffee borer and leaf rust still represent a threat to producers in terms of quality and yields. Due to the Covid-19 restrictions, lack of labor will impact most of the large and medium sized farms as their dependence for harvesting and weeding is not covered by family members or Mingas. 

Next Steps

PECA continues to provide support and guidance to producers through calls/SMS and simultaneously working on paperwork related to our organic certifications in Cajamarca and Cusco. Producers are worried about the lack of labor, but the impact will be less hard on them due to the farm sizes.

Calendar

Mexico
El Salvador
Colombia

Galapagos

Guatemala
Nicaragua

Ecuador

Peru

Mexico
El Salvador
Colombia

Galapagos

Guatemala
Nicaragua

Ecuador

Peru

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