With this harvest dashboard, we aim to keep you informed about the status of the harvest in each of the seven origins where Caravela operates, providing you with valuable information that will help you stay up to date of what’s happening on-the-ground.

Please visit this page frequently as we will be updating it at least once a month. If you have any specific questions, do not hesitate to contact us directly!


Last Update October 27, 2020

 


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

In Chiapas’ lowest lying regions, we are now starting to see the first ripe cherries. Farms that go from 1200 to 1400 MASL will start their first pickings by mid-November and we expect to receive these deliveries in December. In Oaxaca, especially in Los Naranjos and Ozolotepec, they are just starting their first pickings, which indicates that the best of the harvest will start to be collected in November as well.The rains here have ceased, which means that fortunately, there should not be any cherry falls or damages. We expect this harvest to be very homogeneous and the quality to be as great as or better than the last harvest. We also expect greater volumes.Our quality team is currently supporting and working together with our PECA team in the field. Currently we are working to continue developing our organic supply chain that we started last year. This has and will help hundreds of coffee growers achieve their certification, allowing them to be more sustainable both environmentally and economically.

 


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

The coffee cherries continue in the development stage. The rain patterns have favored quality cherry development in all regions of the country. This month, producers are carrying out fertilizations so coffee cherries will begin to fill out. 15% of the farmers in the Eastern region and 60% of farmers in Central and Western Guatemala have applied a 3rd fertilization in this new coffee cycle. This reduces low density issues for the cherry, improves yields, and positively impacts producers' profits. We have also seen a lower incidence of coffee leaf rust and coffee berry borer.Given current conditions and based on field visits, we plan to receive the first coffee lots in December from producers in the Chiquimula, Zacapa, San Marcos, and Quetzaltenango regions. In January 2021, we expect to receive the first lots from Huehuetenango. Compared to last harvest, we project a growth in deliveries and volume due to good management and fertilization carried out by producers. This better productivity will also be accompanied by the addition of new producer partners that will form part of our supply chain this year.PECA continues to calculate harvest estimates for the producers who we work with. We have started internal trainings that allow us to improve efficiency at all levels. Likewise, we have established strategic alliances and projects with CRS Guatemala that will allow us to educate and share the best practices for the production and processing of specialty coffees.


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

El Salvador's harvest is soon arriving! Currently, the coffee plantations in the Chalatenango and Ahuachapán region show a small percentage of beans with low density but a good growth rate. Even though climatic conditions have been favorable, which has allowed the producers to continue with the fertilization rounds, there is still a presence of coffee leaf rust and coffee berry borer. This is affecting the total production of high-quality coffee. To date, 75% of farmers completed a third fertilization and 25% have started a second round. Additionally, the El Salvadorian government has activated a plan to provide some agronomical product and inputs for producers in these areas.There is a slight rebound of coffee leaf rust, that has been seen on some farms. PECA has provided recommendations to counteract this incidence appropriate for this development stage. Certain products cannot be used within the 60-day window before harvest, so finding other solutions is essential. The rust aside, the quality looks promising, we anticipate a wide range of processing types and varieties to arrive in this new crop year. PECA has returned to its normal activities in the field. Thus far, 96 % of our coffee growers have signed up to the Arabica app, helping growers stay in control of farming activities and to connect with help without leaving the farm. We continue carrying out harvest estimates and are providing training session for producers, mainly in the Chalatenango region.PECA and the Relationship Building team have concluded the first stage of an origin project in La Palma, Chalatenango that will allow one producer to increase drying capacity, securing better shelf life for their coffee. PECA and QC have received extra training on farm improvements and quality assessment to begin preparing and calibrating for the coming harvest. 100% of the team is back on site following strict biosecurity protocols. We have started forward contracting based on the estimated harvest and long-term relationships established. New producers and strategic allies have joined from La Libertad and Ahuachapán who will be delivering amazing coffees very soon. Stay tuned!


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

The first cherries will soon be ready for picking in Matagalpa and Jinotega. Around 60% of rural roads have been rebuilt by the government while 40% have been improved by organized producer groups. The Nicaraguan army launched the Safety for Coffee Harvest Plan, which means around 3000 army personnel will be protecting roads, farms, and critical production infrastructure. In Nueva Segovia and Madriz, however, roads are ruined and there is a real fear of loss of production because of this. Producers are awaiting protocols and guidance from local authorities to define in the farm how to protect pickers from COVID-19. Honduras and Costa Rica are limiting the entrance of pickers to their territories, so it seems that Nicargua is the territory with the most workers available.PECA team has finished their forecasting process. We expect 20% more specialty coffee available compared to the last harvest. Rain and fertilization have been managed in an adequate way, so based on this data, we are hoping for an improvement in quality on the farms. This is compared to the last harvest where plantations were affected by the lack of water during the development stage. Although for this harvest the quality and volumes seem to be better than last year, there is a high chance of heavy rain at the end of the year. We must be ready to act, checking our provisions, in case pickers decide to avoid working to keep away from a respiratory illness, linked to COVID-19We expect to export our first container to Australia in December, with some exciting Naturals and honey processed lots. The PECA and Quality team are on the ground helping producers follow quality focused production and processing protocols. In our drying station La Estrella, we are renovating 40% of our drying infrastructure, as we are committed to improving our processes and to manage the new flow of different processed coffees. We are continuing to work on improving our supply chain for washed coffee as well as looking for more honey and natural processed coffees.


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

New harvest cycle has started in most regions with Huila having a higher crop advance than Tolima. However, Cauca and Nariño harvest are almost over and will only be available again in summer 2021. The peak of the harvest will start in November but PECA is expecting a more concentrated harvest this year.Quality has been consistent this year as producers focused on fertilization and improving infrastructure to receive the harvest and have enough drying space for the crop. Now that mobility is allowed and restrictions are less, it is easier to find pickers, so farmers are less focused on looking for labor but instead focusing on quality. Picking has consistently increased, and quality has been consistent despite this year having the highest internal prices of the last 6 years.With the blessing of a continuous crop, local operations never stop and as the past cycle finishes a new one is kicking in. As the end of the year is approaching with potential bottlenecks at ports, we are planning the processing queue well in advance to avoid delays. Contracting for 2021 is in full swing.


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

 Crop advance is over 90% in the northern regions while in the south of the country, farmers report 80% advance. There will be 1-2 more picking rounds by farmers and then the harvest will be over for this year. There is a constant flow of dried lots being
delivered to our warehouses and quality so far continues to be very good with average cupping notes about 0.5 points higher than last year. A small flowering of July/Aug might help farmers collect a small fly crop in March of 2021.
We are delighted to announce that quality continues being very consistent during this harvest! it is proof how the support Caravela provides to producers pays off. Unfortunately volumes this year are about 10% lower than 2019 due to climatic issues and
challenges of farmers to get enough inputs during the peak of COVID restrictions in the country. Additionally, new regions explored previously by PECA such as Puyango and its farmers continue to grow for Caravela as more and more farmers committed to working with Caravela. As the harvest is almost over PECA is mixing processing and drying workshops with post-harvest activities.
We have started exporting continental Ecuador since the end of September and peak export will occur during October and November. Despite the pandemic challenges we are proud to see a double digit growth in number of farmers working with us and volumes delivered. These new relationships demand more time and attention especially from our PECA and Quality teams and therefore, for 2021 more members will join our on the ground staff. The Galapagos harvest will start in about 6-8 weeks and our PECA team will be visiting the island to start pre-harvest workshops by the end of the month. and will continue to do so until December. So far exports from Galapagos are planned for end of Feb until April.


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

As our PECA team forecasted the harvest in Peru is now peaking. We are still receiving and analyzing coffee in our 3 purchasing stations and we expect to continue seeing the last flows of coffee until the end of November.Weather is generating delays on the drying process, but we are still expecting deliveries of small lots from higher altitudes. This was a challenging harvest but being on the ground and having a direct presence in coffee growing regions has helped us overcome many obstacles and has shown producers how much we value them. Being one of the first in reopening our purchasing stations whilst keeping protocols and guaranteeing the safety of producers and employees has meant that we have been available for producers during this entire time.

Some of the strategies that we implemented include:
Collecting samples directly at farms to avoid producers from leaving their homes. Sending trucks to collect the approved coffees farm by farm. Finding new ways to pay

And even starting a radio program with PECA/quality allowing us to reach the most remote areas, so producers can have access to guidance and knowledge during the pandemic!
We are working around the clock on milling and shipments. Some delays at port are expected according to shipping lines (from 1 to 2 weeks) but we are focused on resolving these ASAP.

With this harvest dashboard, we aim to keep you informed about the status of the harvest in each of the seven origins where Caravela operates, providing you with valuable information that will help you stay up to date of what’s happening on-the-ground. 

Please visit this page frequently as we will be updating it at least once a month. If you have any specific questions, do not hesitate to contact us directly!


Last Update October 27, 2020

 

The Facts

In Chiapas’ lowest lying regions, we are now starting to see the first ripe cherries. Farms that go from 1200 to 1400 MASL will start their first pickings by mid-November and we expect to receive these deliveries in December. In Oaxaca, especially in Los Naranjos and Ozolotepec, they are just starting their first pickings, which indicates that the best of the harvest will start to be collected in November as well.

 

Our Take

The rains here have ceased, which means that fortunately, there should not be any cherry falls or damages. We expect this harvest to be very homogeneous and the quality to be as great as or better than the last harvest. We also expect greater volumes.

 

Next Steps

Our quality team is currently supporting and working together with our PECA team in the field. Currently we are working to continue developing our organic supply chain that we started last year. This has and will help hundreds of coffee growers achieve their certification, allowing them to be more sustainable both environmentally and economically.

 

 

The Facts

The coffee cherries continue in the development stage. The rain patterns have favored quality cherry development in all regions of the country. This month, producers are carrying out fertilizations so coffee cherries will begin to fill out. 15% of the farmers in the Eastern region and 60% of farmers in Central and Western Guatemala have applied a 3rd fertilization in this new coffee cycle. This reduces low density issues for the cherry, improves yields, and positively impacts producers’ profits.  We have also seen a lower incidence of coffee leaf rust and coffee berry borer.

Our Take

Given current conditions and based on field visits, we plan to receive the first coffee lots in December from producers in the Chiquimula, Zacapa, San Marcos, and Quetzaltenango regions. In January 2021, we expect to receive the first lots from Huehuetenango. Compared to last harvest, we project a growth in deliveries and volume due to good management and fertilization carried out by producers. This better productivity will also be accompanied by the addition of new producer partners that will form part of our supply chain this year.

 

Next Steps

PECA continues to calculate harvest estimates for the producers who we work with. We have started internal trainings that allow us to improve efficiency at all levels. Likewise, we have established strategic alliances and projects with CRS Guatemala that will allow us to educate and share the best practices for the production and processing of specialty coffees.

 

The Facts

El Salvador’s harvest is soon arriving! Currently, the coffee plantations in the Chalatenango and Ahuachapán region show a small percentage of beans with low density but a good growth rate. Even though climatic conditions have been favorable, which has allowed the producers to continue with the fertilization rounds, there is still a presence of coffee leaf rust and coffee berry borer. This is affecting the total production of high-quality coffee. To date, 75% of farmers completed a third fertilization and 25% have started a second round. Additionally, the El Salvadorian government has activated a plan to provide some agronomical product and inputs for producers in these areas.

 

Our Take

There is a slight rebound of coffee leaf rust, that has been seen on some farms. PECA has provided recommendations to counteract this incidence appropriate for this development stage. Certain products cannot be used within the 60-day window before harvest, so finding other solutions is essential. The rust aside, the quality looks promising, we anticipate a wide range of processing types and varieties to arrive in this new crop year. PECA has returned to its normal activities in the field. Thus far, 96 % of our coffee growers have signed up to the Arabica app, helping growers stay in control of farming activities and to connect with help without leaving the farm. We continue carrying out harvest estimates and are providing training session for producers, mainly in the  Chalatenango region.

 

Next Steps

PECA and the Relationship Building team have concluded the first stage of an origin project in La Palma, Chalatenango that will allow one producer to increase drying capacity, securing better shelf life for their coffee. PECA and QC have received extra training on farm improvements and quality assessment to begin preparing and calibrating for the coming harvest. 100% of the team is back on site following strict biosecurity protocols. We have started forward contracting based on the estimated harvest and long-term relationships established. New producers and strategic allies have joined from La Libertad and Ahuachapán who will be delivering amazing coffees very soon. Stay tuned! 

The Facts

The first cherries will soon be ready for picking in Matagalpa and Jinotega. Around 60% of rural roads have been rebuilt by the government while 40% have been improved by organized producer groups. The Nicaraguan army launched the Safety for Coffee Harvest Plan, which means around 3000 army personnel will be protecting roads, farms, and critical production infrastructure. In Nueva Segovia and Madriz, however, roads are ruined and there is a real fear of loss of production because of this. Producers are awaiting protocols and guidance from local authorities to define in the farm how to protect pickers from COVID-19. Honduras and Costa Rica are limiting the entrance of pickers to their territories, so it seems that Nicargua is the territory with the most workers available.

 

Our Take

PECA team has finished their forecasting process. We expect 20% more specialty coffee available compared to the last harvest. Rain and fertilization have been managed in an adequate way, so based on this data, we are hoping for an improvement in quality on the farms. This is compared to the last harvest where plantations were affected by the lack of water during the development stage. Although for this harvest the quality and volumes seem to be better than last year, there is a high chance of heavy rain at the end of the year. We must be ready to act, checking our provisions, in case pickers decide to avoid working to keep away from a respiratory illness, linked to COVID-19

 

Next Steps

 

We expect to export our first container to Australia in December, with some exciting Naturals and honey processed lots.  The PECA and Quality team are on the ground helping producers follow quality focused production and processing protocols. In our drying station La Estrella, we are renovating 40% of our drying infrastructure, as we are committed to improving our processes and to manage the new flow of different processed coffees. We are continuing to work on improving our supply chain for washed coffee as well as looking for more honey and natural processed coffees.

The Facts

New harvest cycle has started in most regions with Huila having a higher crop advance than Tolima. However, Cauca and Nariño harvest are almost over and will only be available again in summer 2021. The peak of the harvest will start in November but PECA is expecting a more concentrated harvest this year

Our Take

Quality has been consistent this year as producers focused on fertilization and improving infrastructure to receive the harvest and have enough drying space for the crop. Now that mobility is allowed and restrictions are less, it is easier to find pickers, so farmers are less focused on looking for labor but instead focusing on quality. Picking has consistently increased, and quality has been consistent despite this year having the highest internal prices of the last 6 years.

Next Steps

With the blessing of a continuous crop, local operations never stop and as the past cycle finishes a new one is kicking in. As the end of the year is approaching with potential bottlenecks at ports, we are planning the processing queue well in advance to avoid delays. Contracting for 2021 is in full swing.

The Facts

 Crop advance is over 90% in the northern regions while in the south of the country, farmers report 80% advance. There will be 1-2 more picking rounds by farmers and then the harvest will be over for this year. There is a constant flow of dried lots being delivered to our warehouses and quality so far continues to be very good with average cupping notes about 0.5 points higher than last year. A small flowering of July/Aug might help farmers collect a small fly crop in March of 2021.

Our Take

We are delighted to announce that quality continues being very consistent during this harvest! it is proof how the support Caravela provides to producers pays off. Unfortunately volumes this year are about 10% lower than 2019 due to climatic issues and challenges of farmers to get enough inputs during the peak of COVID restrictions in the country. Additionally, new regions explored previously by PECA such as Puyango and its farmers continue to grow for Caravela as more and more farmers committed to working with Caravela. As the harvest is almost over PECA is mixing processing and drying workshops with post-harvest activities.

Next Steps

We have started exporting continental Ecuador since the end of September and peak export will occur during October and November. Despite the pandemic challenges we are proud to see a double digit growth in number of farmers working with us and volumes delivered. These new relationships demand more time and attention especially from our PECA and Quality teams and therefore, for 2021 more members will join our on the ground staff. The Galapagos harvest will start in about 6-8 weeks and our PECA team will be visiting the island to start pre-harvest workshops by the end of the month. and will continue to do so until December. So far exports from Galapagos are planned for end of Feb until April.

The Facts

As our PECA team forecasted the harvest in Peru is now peaking. We are still receiving and analyzing coffee in our 3 purchasing stations and we expect to continue seeing the last flows of coffee until the end of November.  

 

Our Take

Weather is generating delays on the drying process, but we are still expecting deliveries of small lots from higher altitudes. This was a challenging harvest but being on the ground and having a direct presence in coffee growing regions has helped us overcome many obstacles and has shown producers how much we value them. Being one of the first in reopening our purchasing stations whilst keeping protocols and guaranteeing the safety of producers and employees has meant that we have been available for producers during this entire time.

Some of the strategies that we implemented include:

Collecting samples directly at farms to avoid producers from leaving their homes. Sending trucks to collect the approved coffees farm by farm. Finding new ways to pay

And even starting a radio program with PECA/quality allowing us to reach the most remote areas, so producers can have access to guidance and knowledge during the pandemic!

 

Next Steps

We are working around the clock on milling and shipments. Some delays at port are expected according to shipping lines (from 1 to 2 weeks) but we are focused on resolving these ASAP.

Calendar

Mexico

El Salvador
Colombia

Galapagos

Guatemala

Nicaragua

Ecuador

Peru

Mexico

El Salvador
Colombia

Galapagos

Guatemala

Nicaragua

Ecuador

Peru

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