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With this harvest dashboard, we aim to keep you informed about the status of the harvest in each of the seven origins where Caravela operates, providing you with valuable information that will help you stay up to date of what’s happening on-the-ground.

Please visit this page frequently as we will be updating it at least once a month. If you have any specific questions, do not hesitate to contact us directly!


Last Update May 18, 2022

 


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

Cherry picking of the harvest has already reached its end and the commercialization is at a 95%. We’ve seen abundant flowering in the coffee regions, which foretells a good harvest for next year. We are expecting to start in November, first in the farms below 1.100 MASL and for the ones above 1.100 in December. The coffee producers are working in fertilization and management of the crop to secure a plentiful harvest.If the conditions don’t change, we are estimating a harvest of good quality and volume. The downside is the volatility of the price, which makes the purchase of coffee competitive, generating higher prices than expected in the internal market.For the month of May, we have programed the exporting of around 1.763 bags of 60 Kg. The quality team continues to sort coffee from the last deliveries to the warehouses. The warehouses are soon closing for the team to focus on dry milling and logistics. Our PECA team is preparing to start the workshops with the producers along with the quality team.

 

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The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

Local market prices have been competitive for specialty and commercial coffee, and despite the C-Market price decrease; internal coffee prices continue to be high. During this harvest, the PECA and quality control team have carried out mobile laboratories in new and remote areas in the department of Baja Verapaz and Huehuetenango, promoting the PECA Program and sourcing outstanding quality coffee. With this project, more than 50 farmers have benefited by obtaining higher prices and quality feedback.

Additionally, as the harvest season reaches its end in all coffee regions across the country, the flowering stage has started in low-lying areas in Eastern and Central Guatemala. The flowering patterns show full blooming events. Flowering sets the beginning of next year's crop planning and coffee available in the market.
Based on the latest farm visits and PECA field reports, next year's total production looks promising. One of the main challenges that farmers are now facing is the increase in input prices and labor costs, affecting the Central American region in general.

There has been an increase in AAA and ML available, with most of it being exotic varieties and or natural coffee, yet quantities are limited. As more farmers join our supply chain, across the country, there has been an increase in volume. Currently, our quality control team reports quality has been maintained for all PECA growers. The Quality Assurance team continues to perform quality control for all shipments and sending PSS to our Customer Relations Offices (CRO).



Over the next few weeks, PECA will continue working on the Carbon Footprint measurement for all PECA farmers associated. They continue to provide technical assistance as the harvest ends focused on post-harvest management, shade, and fertilization plans remotely and during farm visits.

Up to date, Oakland and New York have been the most challenging to schedule shipments. Thus, the export and logistic team continue working closely with supplier lines to guarantee a smooth process for the next shipments. For updates on your shipments, please reach out to your Sales Representative.


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

The 2023 Harvest continues its stage of development in El Salvador. Producers are delivering the last quality batches, and the remaining lower quality lots will be sold on the local market as commercial coffee or coffee for internal consumption. The weather has been good, benefiting the management practices to be carried out after the harvest, such as shade management, fertilization, and control of the coffee berry borer. Regarding prices, domestic parchment coffee prices remain high in El Salvador.Farmers face challenges with the constant increase in prices and lower availability of agricultural inputs such as fertilizers in the country, which will impact the cost of production. Most smallholders rely on family members for farming activities, but at this time of year, they need to hire local workers to complete more intensive tasks such as fertilization and shade management. The cost of labor is getting higher and less available every day as migration to bigger cities in the country continues.The PECA team is working on analyzing the 2022 harvest data and deliveries from all PECA growers to establish next steps to continue supporting farmers on the ground. The PECA team has also completed the Carbon Footprint measurements, which will serve as a baseline to reduce the carbon footprint at source.

Our quality control team continues to ship PPS and offer samples to our Customer Service Offices (CROs). Meanwhile, containers with fresh harvest hit the water bound for the United States, with more headed to Europe and Australia soon.


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

Coffee growers in Nicaragua are currently focused on tissue management. There have been two marked flowering events and there will be another happening over the next weeks. Simultaneously, coffee growers are working on their fertilization plans and analyzing best-case scenarios to complete the fertilization programs as agricultural input prices have doubled or tripled. This month the PECA team will continue working on tracking all flowering events dates to have a more exact estimate for next year’s crop availability and cycle development. They will also provide quality feedback and reports for all coffee deliveries in La Estrella and Jinotega.Cup quality has been constant throughout the harvest. As new farmers join our supply chain, they are also venturing to improve processing practices. Caravela is by their side, helping and guiding this transition. Purchases of parchment increased this year and volumes contracted, as customers have welcomed Nicaraguan coffee for its consistency and quality. Sample and PSS offers have been successfully approved and the Quality team continues to benefit and export coffee.The production for April was processed without any relevant event, managing to process 100% on time. Regarding milling, we are preparing to process shipments for May, for which we have a production advance of 49%. Currently, the destination with the highest incidence of capsizing by shipping companies was Sydney. In May we have an advance of 70% concerning bookings. The main challenge for bookings this month in the USA, with destinations to Chicago and Houston.


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

The harvest is advancing in an average of 30% an all the regions, with a higher advancement in Tolima with a 35%. The producers are currently working in weed control and fertilization, but also in the bigging of cherry collection depending on each municipality. In Tolima and the center west of Huila, the cherry picking is currently higher compared to the other areas. Our PECA team has been working in harvest estimates and production costs with the coffee producers and updating the information of each farm.Our volumes have increased by almost double compared to last years, with the biggest percentage coming from RTB. Given the nature of the first passes, the physical and sensory quality is not yet the best and is expected to improve as the harvest starts to advance. One of the good aspects has been the improvement in some areas which has allowed for better passes, flowering and if the dry days continue, it will favor the drying. On the downside, the high price at which the local market is purchasing the coffee, we continue to see wet coffee being commercialized.Shipments continue, but due to the current situations in the world -conflict in Ukraine and lockdowns in China- we have seen a lack of containers with most of the shipments being sent through the dock of Cartagena than Buenaventura, as it is easier to find ships thru this port.

Our PECA team continues to work alongside with producers for good harvest practices and carrying on visits for the harvest estimate. Our quality is receiving coffee at the warehouses, and so they continue with the purchase of coffee carrying on the physical and sensory analysis to give timely feedback to the producers.


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

Harvest in all the country is starting. In the south, at Loja we are at a 2% expecting the peak of the harvest for July. While in Zamora, the volumes are increasing week by week as the advancement of the harvest is at 15%, expecting the peak of the harvest between June and July. In the north of the country, the harvest is at a 17%, expecting the peak of the harvest for July. Our PECA team has been visiting the producers to see how the harvest is coming along and advising on good post-harvest practices focused in drying and wet mill to assure quality.In the south of the country, in Zamora, we have been purchasing the first coffees from the harvest which quality wise are A-AA, showing potential in quality. The rainy season has been affecting the coffee producers, as they haven’t been able to dry in some cases the coffee with the required parameters.

The volumes for this year, due to biannually, are expected to be lower but we are expecting higher volumes from Loja and in Galapagos Islands. We have been also looking into new areas to start relationship with producers and buy coffee.
Regarding shipments, we have 72 bags in line to be exported to New York at the end of May. In our dry mill, we are in verifications, adjustments, and maintenance to our production line to be ready for the peak of the harvest when the volumes start arriving. The quality team has been focusing on analyzing some samples that have arriving of the first coffees to assess sensory and physical aspects. On the other hand, PECA has been working with the producers on good practices for harvest and post-harvest to assure a good quality of the coffee.


The Facts

Our Take

Next Steps

The harvest is just starting in the country with a 9% advancement in the north, Cajamarca. In this area we’ve seen rains above normal, which creates negative conditions for the harvest. In some areas of Cajamarca we’ve noticed fruit droppage from the trees caused by the heavy rains and an increase in leaf rust, but low levels of borer beetle. From this percentage of the harvest, a small percentage of 2% has been commercialized as commercial coffee due to the low quality and as wet coffee due to the climatic conditions. In the south of the country, Cusco, the harvest is at a 3% advancement also seeing an impact of the heavy rains.

In some areas below 1.300 MASL the harvest it is advancing at a 25% but it is coffee sold as wet with low quality, as commercial coffee.

The harvest is showing a lower yield compared to last years, at about a 20% due to the negative weather conditions for the good development of the cherry. Also, the abrupt rise in the price of fertilizers is affecting all producers. We have been organizing and carrying on ECAS and workshops with groups for the producers where we touch on different topics such as fertilization plans, monitoring of leaf rust and chicken eye, keeping a record of activities, costs of production and post-harvest.

At his moment, the biggest percentage of the farms are making the first passes of the harvest. The challenge lies in improving the volume of AAA and ML qualities, for which we have been working closely with the coffee producers who achieved the best qualities in 2021.
Our PECA team has been organizing meetings and workshops alongside our quality team, talking about subjects in accordance with the necessities of the coffee producers and with the process the farms are in right now. As a team we are constantly working with the producers in not abandoning the production of quality coffee. We are also carrying on personalized visits to the producers touching upon topics such as fertilization and harvest and post-harvest practices.

The shipment months are going to be June to December, and our logistic allies have started to tell us that there our great delays in the bookings. Some shipping companies are full one month in advance, for which we must prepare with anticipation. Additionally, due to the conflict in Ukraine and lockdowns in China, the tariffs are still as high as the end of 2021 and could potentially go up.

With this harvest dashboard, we aim to keep you informed about the status of the harvest in each of the seven origins where Caravela operates, providing you with valuable information that will help you stay up to date of what’s happening on-the-ground.

Please visit this page frequently as we will be updating it at least once a month. If you have any specific questions, do not hesitate to contact us directly!


Last Update May 18, 2022

 

The Facts

Cherry picking of the harvest has already reached its end and the commercialization is at a 95%. We’ve seen abundant flowering in the coffee regions, which foretells a good harvest for next year. We are expecting to start in November, first in the farms below 1.100 MASL and for the ones above 1.100 in December. The coffee producers are working in fertilization and management of the crop to secure a plentiful harvest.

Our Take

If the conditions don’t change, we are estimating a harvest of good quality and volume. The downside is the volatility of the price, which makes the purchase of coffee competitive, generating higher prices than expected in the internal market.

Next Steps

For the month of May, we have programed the exporting of around 1.763 bags of 60 Kg. The quality team continues to sort coffee from the last deliveries to the warehouses. The warehouses are soon closing for the team to focus on dry milling and logistics. Our PECA team is preparing to start the workshops with the producers along with the quality team.

 

The Facts

Local market prices have been competitive for specialty and commercial coffee, and despite the C-Market price decrease; internal coffee prices continue to be high. During this harvest, the PECA and quality control team have carried out mobile laboratories in new and remote areas in the department of Baja Verapaz and Huehuetenango, promoting the PECA Program and sourcing outstanding quality coffee. With this project, more than 50 farmers have benefited by obtaining higher prices and quality feedback.

Additionally, as the harvest season reaches its end in all coffee regions across the country, the flowering stage has started in low-lying areas in Eastern and Central Guatemala. The flowering patterns show full blooming events. Flowering sets the beginning of next year’s crop planning and coffee available in the market.

Our Take

Based on the latest farm visits and PECA field reports, next year’s total production looks promising. One of the main challenges that farmers are now facing is the increase in input prices and labor costs, affecting the Central American region in general.

There has been an increase in AAA and ML available, with most of it being exotic varieties and or natural coffee, yet quantities are limited. As more farmers join our supply chain, across the country, there has been an increase in volume. Currently, our quality control team reports quality has been maintained for all PECA growers. The Quality Assurance team continues to perform quality control for all shipments and sending PSS to our Customer Relations Offices (CRO).

 

Next Steps

Over the next few weeks, PECA will continue working on the Carbon Footprint measurement for all PECA farmers associated. They continue to provide technical assistance as the harvest ends focused on post-harvest management, shade, and fertilization plans remotely and during farm visits.

Up to date, Oakland and New York have been the most challenging to schedule shipments. Thus, the export and logistic team continue working closely with supplier lines to guarantee a smooth process for the next shipments. For updates on your shipments, please reach out to your Sales Representative.

The Facts

The 2023 Harvest continues its stage of development in El Salvador. Producers are delivering the last quality batches, and the remaining lower quality lots will be sold on the local market as commercial coffee or coffee for internal consumption. The weather has been good, benefiting the management practices to be carried out after the harvest, such as shade management, fertilization, and control of the coffee berry borer. Regarding prices, domestic parchment coffee prices remain high in El Salvador.

Our Take

Farmers face challenges with the constant increase in prices and lower availability of agricultural inputs such as fertilizers in the country, which will impact the cost of production. Most smallholders rely on family members for farming activities, but at this time of year, they need to hire local workers to complete more intensive tasks such as fertilization and shade management. The cost of labor is getting higher and less available every day as migration to bigger cities in the country continues. 

Next Steps

The PECA team is working on analyzing the 2022 harvest data and deliveries from all PECA growers to establish next steps to continue supporting farmers on the ground. The PECA team has also completed the Carbon Footprint measurements, which will serve as a baseline to reduce the carbon footprint at source.

Our quality control team continues to ship PPS and offer samples to our Customer Service Offices (CROs). Meanwhile, containers with fresh harvest hit the water bound for the United States, with more headed to Europe and Australia soon.

The Facts

Coffee growers in Nicaragua are currently focused on tissue management. There have been two marked flowering events and there will be another happening over the next weeks. Simultaneously, coffee growers are working on their fertilization plans and analyzing best-case scenarios to complete the fertilization programs as agricultural input prices have doubled or tripled. This month the PECA team will continue working on tracking all flowering events dates to have a more exact estimate for next year’s crop availability and cycle development. They will also provide quality feedback and reports for all coffee deliveries in La Estrella and Jinotega.

Our Take

Cup quality has been constant throughout the harvest. As new farmers join our supply chain, they are also venturing to improve processing practices. Caravela is by their side, helping and guiding this transition. Purchases of parchment increased this year and volumes contracted, as customers have welcomed Nicaraguan coffee for its consistency and quality. Sample and PSS offers have been successfully approved and the Quality team continues to benefit and export coffee. 

Next Steps

The production for April was processed without any relevant event, managing to process 100% on time. Regarding milling, we are preparing to process shipments for May, for which we have a production advance of 49%. Currently, the destination with the highest incidence of capsizing by shipping companies was Sydney. In May we have an advance of 70% concerning bookings. The main challenge for bookings this month in the USA, with destinations to Chicago and Houston.

The Facts

The harvest is advancing in an average of 30% an all the regions, with a higher advancement in Tolima with a 35%. The producers are currently working in weed control and fertilization, but also in the bigging of cherry collection depending on each municipality. In Tolima and the center west of Huila, the cherry picking is currently higher compared to the other areas. Our PECA team has been working in harvest estimates and production costs with the coffee producers and updating the information of each farm.

Our Take

Our volumes have increased by almost double compared to last years, with the biggest percentage coming from RTB. Given the nature of the first passes, the physical and sensory quality is not yet the best and is expected to improve as the harvest starts to advance. One of the good aspects has been the improvement in some areas which has allowed for better passes, flowering and if the dry days continue, it will favor the drying. On the downside, the high price at which the local market is purchasing the coffee, we continue to see wet coffee being commercialized.

 

Next Steps

Shipments continue, but due to the current situations in the world -conflict in Ukraine and lockdowns in China- we have seen a lack of containers with most of the shipments being sent through the dock of Cartagena than Buenaventura, as it is easier to find ships thru this port.

Our PECA team continues to work alongside with producers for good harvest practices and carrying on visits for the harvest estimate. Our quality is receiving coffee at the warehouses, and so they continue with the purchase of coffee carrying on the physical and sensory analysis to give timely feedback to the producers.

 

The Facts

Harvest in all the country is starting. In the south, at Loja we are at a 2% expecting the peak of the harvest for July. While in Zamora, the volumes are increasing week by week as the advancement of the harvest is at 15%, expecting the peak of the harvest between June and July. In the north of the country, the harvest is at a 17%, expecting the peak of the harvest for July. Our PECA team has been visiting the producers to see how the harvest is coming along and advising on good post-harvest practices focused in drying and wet mill to assure quality.

Our Take

In the south of the country, in Zamora, we have been purchasing the first coffees from the harvest which quality wise are A-AA, showing potential in quality. The rainy season has been affecting the coffee producers, as they haven’t been able to dry in some cases the coffee with the required parameters.

The volumes for this year, due to biannually, are expected to be lower but we are expecting higher volumes from Loja and in Galapagos Islands. We have been also looking into new areas to start relationship with producers and buy coffee.

Next Steps

Regarding shipments, we have 72 bags in line to be exported to New York at the end of May. In our dry mill, we are in verifications, adjustments, and maintenance to our production line to be ready for the peak of the harvest when the volumes start arriving. The quality team has been focusing on analyzing some samples that have arriving of the first coffees to assess sensory and physical aspects. On the other hand, PECA has been working with the producers on good practices for harvest and post-harvest to assure a good quality of the coffee.

The Facts

The harvest is just starting in the country with a 9% advancement in the north, Cajamarca. In this area we’ve seen rains above normal, which creates negative conditions for the harvest. In some areas of Cajamarca we’ve noticed fruit droppage from the trees caused by the heavy rains and an increase in leaf rust, but low levels of borer beetle. From this percentage of the harvest, a small percentage of 2% has been commercialized as commercial coffee due to the low quality and as wet coffee due to the climatic conditions. In the south of the country, Cusco, the harvest is at a 3% advancement also seeing an impact of the heavy rains.

In some areas below 1.300 MASL the harvest it is advancing at a 25% but it is coffee sold as wet with low quality, as commercial coffee.

Our Take

The harvest is showing a lower yield compared to last years, at about a 20% due to the negative weather conditions for the good development of the cherry. Also, the abrupt rise in the price of fertilizers is affecting all producers. We have been organizing and carrying on ECAS and workshops with groups for the producers where we touch on different topics such as fertilization plans, monitoring of leaf rust and chicken eye, keeping a record of activities, costs of production and post-harvest.

At his moment, the biggest percentage of the farms are making the first passes of the harvest. The challenge lies in improving the volume of AAA and ML qualities, for which we have been working closely with the coffee producers who achieved the best qualities in 2021.

Next Steps

Our PECA team has been organizing meetings and workshops alongside our quality team, talking about subjects in accordance with the necessities of the coffee producers and with the process the farms are in right now. As a team we are constantly working with the producers in not abandoning the production of quality coffee. We are also carrying on personalized visits to the producers touching upon topics such as fertilization and harvest and post-harvest practices.

The shipment months are going to be June to December, and our logistic allies have started to tell us that there our great delays in the bookings. Some shipping companies are full one month in advance, for which we must prepare with anticipation. Additionally, due to the conflict in Ukraine and lockdowns in China, the tariffs are still as high as the end of 2021 and could potentially go up.

Calendar

Mexico

El Salvador
Colombia

Galapagos

Guatemala

Nicaragua

Ecuador

Peru

Mexico

El Salvador
Colombia

Galapagos

Guatemala

Nicaragua

Ecuador

Peru

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